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Call For Entries: Student Work

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To recognize and support the work of students, Fine Woodworking will be devoting future Readers Gallery space to showcase current student work. Eligibility extends to current work by full-time students enrolled in the 2006/2007 school year in a high school (secondary) or post-secondary school program such as colleges and universities as well as woodworking, art, and design schools. The deadline for submissions is May 15, 2007.

Photographing your work
Taking good photos of your work is one way to improve your chance of being featured in the magazine or on FineWoodworking.com. Here are some tips:
– Shoot your work against a neutral background; a bed sheet or drop cloth will suffice.
– Make sure you have plenty of indirect light from windows or light fixtures.
– Take photos from many angles, overall and up close, to provide a complete presentation of your work.
– Clean the furniture, and don’t clutter the object with items such as books or collectibles.
– Do not alter the images or remove the background electronically.

How to make a submission
Download, Print and complete this form and send it along with any photos (prints, slides, or digital images on a photo CD) to:

Fine Woodworking Readers Gallery
The Taunton Press
63 South Main Street
Newtown, CT 06470-5506

Or, you can email your photos and information to fwgallery@taunton.com. Digital photos should be in high-resolution format and unaltered. If you would like your materials returned, please include a self-addressed envelope with proper postage.

Photo: Corey Martin crafted this tambour secretary desk as a first-year student at the Furniture Institute of Massachusetts. Photo by Matt Berger.

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Published at Tue, 06 Mar 2007 05:00:00 +0000

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Full-size Templates—A Unique Way

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I produce a staggering number of full-size templates—sometimes exceeding a dozen for one piece of furniture. They are so easy to produce in SketchUp, and the more I create, the faster I can produce a piece of furniture. Not only are they used to re-create various arcs, tapers, and shapes, but also in the layout of dovetails and other joinery, turnings, inlay design, the location of pins, dowels, nails, and screws, and hardware installation.

If I had to produce these templates using plywood, or other wood and plastic products, my use of full-size templates would substantially diminish, and I’d be less efficient in the shop. It just takes too much time with these materials. I find thick poster board to be the best material. I buy it at art stores where I can obtain a thicker paper product than is available in typical school-grade poster boards. Using poster board allows me to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes.

Currently I’m building a Kitchen Dresser, circa 1750, with excellent bracket details and shapes. In fact, there are a number of beautiful shapes in this piece including the crown molding, scroll shapes in the sides and header, cutouts for the spoon rack, rounded feet, and dovetail joints. To re-create these shapes in the shop, full-size templates are critical.

Here is a view of the overall SketchUp model:

Assembly 3

Here is a perspective view of the side component that includes many of the complex shapes.

Side Perspective

And here are several of the templates needed in the shop – shown below in this order:

  • Crown Molding
  • Foot
  • Dovetails
  • Middle Bracket in Side Component
  • Spoon Rack
  • Upper Bracket in Side Component
  • Header

Crown Molding TemplateFootSide DovetailsSide Middle BracketSpoon RackUpper Bracket ShapesUpper Header

In the following video, I show how I produce templates in SketchUp with my home printer and 8 1/2 x 11 sheets. For my students, I use Layout and produce a PDF of full-size templates on large-scale paper. Thus students are not burdened with connecting multiple sheets of 8 1/2 x 11. But in my own work in the shop, I prefer printing on 8 1/2 x 11 sheets since the connecting of multiple sheets is quite easy and fast.

And here is a short video showing how I use the printouts from SketchUp to make the full-size templates.


Tim

@KillenWOOD

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Published at Tue, 08 Nov 2016 15:55:46 +0000

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Sirrus Nexabond 2500

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Instant Glue Creates Strong Bond

Every now and then you come across a tool that dramatically changes the way you work. Nexabond 2500 is one of those tools. I use a lot of jigs when making furniture, and it’s the perfect glue for securing fences and other parts to them. It also works great for gluing solid-wood edge-banding to sheet goods, even around curves. And because it contains no water, it doesn’t cause materials like MDF to swell. The bond it forms between parts is amazingly strong, but for critical jig parts I’ll continue to reinforce the joint with screws.

Application is very easy. Just a few drops is all you need (don’t spread it over the entire joint like you do with PVA glues). Hold the parts together for a few minutes with clamps, and the joint is done. Edge-banding can be trimmed flush after just 30 minutes. But you don’t need to rush. Nexabond 2500 remains workable until you bring the two parts together and apply pressure. You can apply it to a joint and let it sit. It is available in three different set times: fast (1 to 3 minutes), medium (3 to 5 minutes), and slow (5 to 10 minutes). I use the medium set most frequently.

I also tried Nexabond 2500 for slip-tenon joinery on some small tables. The glue acted as a lubricant, making it easier to get the tenons into the mortises. However, joints must be really tight for the glue to activate. And the squeeze-out became rubbery and difficult to remove. Nexabond 2500 is great for jigs and edging, but I’ll stick with PVA glue for joinery.

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Editor Test Results:

Overall Rating N/A

Manufacturer Specifications:

Manufacturer Sirrus
Manufacturer’s Web Site www.sirruschemistry.com
Manufacturer’s Phone Number 513.448.0308
Weight N/A
Dimensions N/A

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Published at Wed, 04 Jun 2014 04:00:00 +0000

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Mini Workbench Makes Detail Work Easier

Lisa Raleigh, Colin Russel, and Gary Junken

Period furniture maker Steve Latta first conceived of his “minibench” as a way to raise detail work to a more comfortable height, and to hold legs and other furniture parts for joinery cuts. Clamped atop his regular workbench, the minibench gets work closer to his eyes without having to bend over. The 42-in. long top is perfect for most furniture parts. It sports a vise on one end, and dog holes make it easy to hold parts.

In this short video, Fine Woodworking senior web producer Ed Pirnik offers a soup-to-nuts overview on the bench.

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Get the Full-Size Plan

Visit the Taunton Store to purchase plans for the mini workbench.

Buy The Plan

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Published at Wed, 22 Oct 2014 00:55:27 +0000

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Shaker Side Table

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The Shakers designed and built a variety of beautiful round stands, but this one is the ultimate. Its slightly concave tapering post, thin top, and light, half-crescent legs are the epitome of classic Shaker design. The design has been refined over several versions until it is near to the original as possible. With a lathe and careful attention to detail, this classic is not hard to build. The post is turned and the curved legs are dovetailed into it. The top is a simple round with a smoothly curved edge profile.

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Get the Full-Size Plan

CAD-drawn plans and a cutlist for this project are available in the Fine Woodworking store.

Buy The Plan

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Published at Wed, 05 Feb 2014 05:00:00 +0000

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Mining Danish Modern

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In this first Designer’s Notebook department, we take a look at the inspiration and design process behind a desk by Timothy Rousseau. The inspiration was Danish Modern, and the end view of the desk was the element that consumed much of the maker’s initial energy. But the process of designing furniture is influenced by lots of different things, and some of them are unintended. In this case, time constraints came into play and helped to simplify and clarify Rousseau’s vision of the desk. The end result? Judge for yourselves.

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Published at Wed, 03 Dec 2014 05:00:00 +0000

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A Beaded Frame for the Kitchen Dresser

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I’m building this Kitchen Dresser, circa 1750, and it has a beaded frame in its top section. Below is the assembly with the beaded frame selected and highlighted.

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The following picture shows an exploded view of the frame. This construction is very typical in 18th century furniture for use in doors and windows.

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In this close-up view of the upper left-hand corner, you can see how the stile is cut back to receive the rail with a mitered bead at the corner.

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In the following video, I show a method for creating that beaded frame detail in SketchUp. It is very similar to the method used by Dave Richards in his last post, Routing Edge Profiles.

Tim

@KillenWOOD

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Published at Thu, 08 Dec 2016 01:02:19 +0000

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Lacework in Oak

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When Pascal Oudet turns vessels from oak, he takes the material down to its very essence — the medullary rays and growth rings–revealing a beautiful portrait of one of the world’s most well-known woods.

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Published at Wed, 27 Jul 2016 04:00:00 +0000