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Cabinets – FineWoodworking


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I produce a staggering number of full-size templates—sometimes exceeding a dozen for one piece of furniture. They are so easy to produce in SketchUp, and the more I create, the faster I can produce a piece of furniture. Not only are they used to re-create various arcs, tapers, and shapes, but also in the layout of dovetails and other joinery, turnings, inlay design, the location of pins, dowels, nails, and screws, and hardware installation.

If I had to produce these templates using plywood, or other wood and plastic products, my use of full-size templates would substantially diminish, and I’d be less efficient in the shop. It just takes too much time with these materials. I find thick poster board to be the best material. I buy it at art stores where I can obtain a thicker paper product than is available in typical school-grade poster boards. Using poster board allows me to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes.

Currently I’m building a Kitchen Dresser, circa 1750, with excellent bracket details and shapes. In fact, there are a number of beautiful shapes in this piece including the crown molding, scroll shapes in the sides and header, cutouts for the spoon rack, rounded feet, and dovetail joints. To re-create these shapes in the shop, full-size templates are critical.

Here is a view of the overall SketchUp model:

Assembly 3

Here is a perspective view of the side component that includes many of the complex shapes.

Side Perspective

And here are several of the templates needed in the shop – shown below in this order:

  • Crown Molding
  • Foot
  • Dovetails
  • Middle Bracket in Side Component
  • Spoon Rack
  • Upper Bracket in Side Component
  • Header

Crown Molding TemplateFootSide DovetailsSide Middle BracketSpoon RackUpper Bracket ShapesUpper Header

In the following video, I show how I produce templates in SketchUp with my home printer and 8 1/2 x 11 sheets. For my students, I use Layout and produce a PDF of full-size templates on large-scale paper. Thus students are not burdened with connecting multiple sheets of 8 1/2 x 11. But in my own work in the shop, I prefer printing on 8 1/2 x 11 sheets since the connecting of multiple sheets is quite easy and fast.

And here is a short video showing how I use the printouts from SketchUp to make the full-size templates.


Tim

@KillenWOOD

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Cabinets – FineWoodworking

Cabinets – FineWoodworkingDisplay Cabinet on a StandTongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen DresserFull-size Templates—A Unique Way

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.finewoodworking.com%2Fcategory%2Fcabinets%2Ffeed%2F&max=5 Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226618 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034-700×394.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Joinery takes center stage in this cabinet-on-stand. The base and case are made with contrasting woods, but the straight grain of the riftsawn stock unifies the two. An apron and rail on each side of the case make for a strong, light-looking base. A wide upper front apron paired with a narrow lower rail accomplishes the same objective. The base is joined with through-mortise-and-tenons, lightened with tapers and curves. Latticework on the front door dresses up the dovetailed cabinet on top.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/226618/011259034.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <div class=”store-project__plan”><img class=”store-project__plan__image” src=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/app/uploads/uploadedimages/fine_woodworking_network/image_resources/in-house_ads/Project_Plans_th.jpg”/><div class=”store-project__plan__copy”> <div class=”store-project__plan__text” readability=”31.5″> <h5 class=”store-project__plan__heading”>Get the Full-Size Plan</h5> <div class=”store-project__plan__blurb” readability=”8″> <p>Printed and digital plans and a cutlist for this project are available in the Fine Woodworking store.</p> </div> </div> <a class=”store-project__plan__action” href=”https://www.tauntonstore.com/kumiko-cabinet-on-stand.html” target=”_blank”>Buy The Plan</a></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 02 Dec 2016 13:51:02 +0000 Michael Pekovich article Display Cabinet on a Stand – FineWoodworking Eye-catching details and contrasting woods make this a case to remember http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034.jpg summary_large_image Eye-catching details and contrasting woods make this a case to remember Display Cabinet on a Stand – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand Cabinets Cabinet-on-Stand http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226446 <p>Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this style of joinery, which also includes a 1/4-in. beaded edge. A paneled door would be a much safer design as it inherently allows for seasonal wood movement. To accommodate wood movement in the tongue-and-groove door is much more complicated. The joints cannot be glued and must be able to move, allowing the door width to expand and contract. As shown in the video below, I include 1/16-in. gaps at each joint and on the right and left edges. To maintain door integrity, horizontal and diagonal battens are connected to the back face of the door. The battens are attached with wood screws in slotted shank holes, again to allow for the seasonal movement.</p> <p>Here is the dresser assembly with the door removed from its opening.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226447″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-700×711.png” alt=”Door Removed” width=”700″ height=”711″/></p> <p>The back face of the door includes two horizontal battens and one diagonal batten held with wood screws in slotted shank holes (no glue).</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226501″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-700×749.png” alt=”Door Rear View” width=”700″ height=”749″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-700×749.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-768×822.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View.png 782w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>This shows the top edges of the assembled door and copies of the two components pulled out in front. You can see the 1/16-in. gaps in the tongue-and-groove joints.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226449″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-700×400.png” alt=”Top View Door Components” width=”700″ height=”400″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-700×400.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-768×439.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-1200×686.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components.png 1354w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Here is the video:</p> <p><iframe src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/tpPCxukDing” width=”560″ height=”314″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe></p> <p>Here is the progress in the shop—all material is Monterey Pine.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226502″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-700×933.jpg” alt=”IMG_5964″ width=”700″ height=”933″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-700×933.jpg 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-768×1024.jpg 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-1200×1600.jpg 1200w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Tim</p> <p>@KillenWOOD</p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 22 Nov 2016 05:01:34 +0000 article Tongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen Dresser – FineWoodworking Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this … http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-e1479821861598.png summary_large_image Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this […] Tongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen Dresser – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-e1479821861598.png @KillenWOOD en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser Cabinets http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=225862 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150555/Shape-Middle-Side-700×452.png” alt=”Article Image”/><p>I produce a staggering number of full-size templates—sometimes exceeding a dozen for one piece of furniture. They are so easy to produce in SketchUp, and the more I create, the faster I can produce a piece of furniture. Not only are they used to re-create various arcs, tapers, and shapes, but also in the layout of dovetails and other joinery, turnings, inlay design, the location of pins, dowels, nails, and screws, and hardware installation.</p><p>If I had to produce these templates using plywood, or other wood and plastic products, my use of full-size templates would substantially diminish, and I’d be less efficient in the shop. It just takes too much time with these materials. I find thick poster board to be the best material. I buy it at art stores where I can obtain a thicker paper product than is available in typical school-grade poster boards. Using poster board allows me to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes.</p> <p>Currently I’m building a Kitchen Dresser, circa 1750, with excellent bracket details and shapes. In fact, there are a number of beautiful shapes in this piece including the crown molding, scroll shapes in the sides and header, cutouts for the spoon rack, rounded feet, and dovetail joints. To re-create these shapes in the shop, full-size templates are critical.</p> <p>Here is a view of the overall SketchUp model:</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225863″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-700×769.png” alt=”Assembly 3″ width=”700″ height=”769″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-700×769.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-768×844.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3.png 810w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Here is a perspective view of the side component that includes many of the complex shapes.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225869″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150615/Side-Perspective.png” alt=”Side Perspective” width=”532″ height=”875″/></p> <p>And here are several of the templates needed in the shop – shown below in this order:</p> <ul><li>Crown Molding</li> <li>Foot</li> <li>Dovetails</li> <li>Middle Bracket in Side Component</li> <li>Spoon Rack</li> <li>Upper Bracket in Side Component</li> <li>Header</li> </ul><p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225864″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template.png” alt=”Crown Molding Template” width=”669″ height=”671″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template.png 669w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template-300×300.png 300w” sizes=”(max-width: 669px) 100vw, 669px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225865″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-700×167.png” alt=”Foot” width=”700″ height=”167″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-700×167.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-768×183.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-1200×286.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot.png 1462w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225867″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-700×310.png” alt=”Side Dovetails” width=”700″ height=”310″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-700×310.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-768×340.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails.png 1025w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225868″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-700×664.png” alt=”Side Middle Bracket” width=”700″ height=”664″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-700×664.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-768×729.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket.png 918w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225870″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-700×302.png” alt=”Spoon Rack” width=”700″ height=”302″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-700×302.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-768×331.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack.png 861w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225871″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-700×569.png” alt=”Upper Bracket Shapes” width=”700″ height=”569″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-700×569.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-768×624.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes.png 947w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225872″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-700×284.png” alt=”Upper Header” width=”700″ height=”284″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-700×284.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-768×311.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-1200×486.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header.png 1217w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>In the following video, I show how I produce templates in SketchUp with my home printer and 8 1/2 x 11 sheets. For my students, I use Layout and produce a PDF of full-size templates on large-scale paper. Thus students are not burdened with connecting multiple sheets of 8 1/2 x 11. But in my own work in the shop, I prefer printing on 8 1/2 x 11 sheets since the connecting of multiple sheets is quite easy and fast.</p> <p><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/8j7vGazbtzU?rel=0″ width=”560″ height=”315″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe></p> <p>And here is a short video showing how I use the printouts from SketchUp to make the full-size templates.</p> <p><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/DAIiLO1mEuw?rel=0″ width=”560″ height=”315″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe><br/>Tim</p> <p>@KillenWOOD</p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 08 Nov 2016 15:55:46 +0000 Tim Killen article Full-size Templates—A Unique Way – FineWoodworking Creating full size templates from SketchUp is easier than you think http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/07064010/Shape-Middle-Side-thumb-16×9.png summary_large_image Creating full size templates from SketchUp is easier than you think Full-size Templates—A Unique Way – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/07064010/Shape-Middle-Side-thumb-16×9.png @KillenWOOD en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way Cabinets Sketchup

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Cabinets – FineWoodworking

Cabinets – FineWoodworkingDisplay Cabinet on a StandTongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen DresserFull-size Templates—A Unique Way

http://www.finewoodworking.com Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226618 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034-700×394.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Joinery takes center stage in this cabinet-on-stand. The base and case are made with contrasting woods, but the straight grain of the riftsawn stock unifies the two. An apron and rail on each side of the case make for a strong, light-looking base. A wide upper front apron paired with a narrow lower rail accomplishes the same objective. The base is joined with through-mortise-and-tenons, lightened with tapers and curves. Latticework on the front door dresses up the dovetailed cabinet on top.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/226618/011259034.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <div class=”store-project__plan”><img class=”store-project__plan__image” src=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/app/uploads/uploadedimages/fine_woodworking_network/image_resources/in-house_ads/Project_Plans_th.jpg”/><div class=”store-project__plan__copy”> <div class=”store-project__plan__text” readability=”31.5″> <h5 class=”store-project__plan__heading”>Get the Full-Size Plan</h5> <div class=”store-project__plan__blurb” readability=”8″> <p>Printed and digital plans and a cutlist for this project are available in the Fine Woodworking store.</p> </div> </div> <a class=”store-project__plan__action” href=”https://www.tauntonstore.com/kumiko-cabinet-on-stand.html” target=”_blank”>Buy The Plan</a></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 02 Dec 2016 13:51:02 +0000 Michael Pekovich article Display Cabinet on a Stand – FineWoodworking Eye-catching details and contrasting woods make this a case to remember http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034.jpg summary_large_image Eye-catching details and contrasting woods make this a case to remember Display Cabinet on a Stand – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand Cabinets Cabinet-on-Stand http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226446 <p>Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this style of joinery, which also includes a 1/4-in. beaded edge. A paneled door would be a much safer design as it inherently allows for seasonal wood movement. To accommodate wood movement in the tongue-and-groove door is much more complicated. The joints cannot be glued and must be able to move, allowing the door width to expand and contract. As shown in the video below, I include 1/16-in. gaps at each joint and on the right and left edges. To maintain door integrity, horizontal and diagonal battens are connected to the back face of the door. The battens are attached with wood screws in slotted shank holes, again to allow for the seasonal movement.</p> <p>Here is the dresser assembly with the door removed from its opening.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226447″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-700×711.png” alt=”Door Removed” width=”700″ height=”711″/></p> <p>The back face of the door includes two horizontal battens and one diagonal batten held with wood screws in slotted shank holes (no glue).</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226501″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-700×749.png” alt=”Door Rear View” width=”700″ height=”749″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-700×749.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-768×822.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View.png 782w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>This shows the top edges of the assembled door and copies of the two components pulled out in front. You can see the 1/16-in. gaps in the tongue-and-groove joints.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226449″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-700×400.png” alt=”Top View Door Components” width=”700″ height=”400″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-700×400.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-768×439.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-1200×686.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components.png 1354w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Here is the video:</p> <p><iframe src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/tpPCxukDing” width=”560″ height=”314″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe></p> <p>Here is the progress in the shop—all material is Monterey Pine.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226502″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-700×933.jpg” alt=”IMG_5964″ width=”700″ height=”933″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-700×933.jpg 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-768×1024.jpg 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-1200×1600.jpg 1200w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Tim</p> <p>@KillenWOOD</p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 22 Nov 2016 05:01:34 +0000 article Tongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen Dresser – FineWoodworking Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this … http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-e1479821861598.png summary_large_image Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this […] Tongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen Dresser – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-e1479821861598.png @KillenWOOD en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser Cabinets http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=225862 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150555/Shape-Middle-Side-700×452.png” alt=”Article Image”/><p>I produce a staggering number of full-size templates—sometimes exceeding a dozen for one piece of furniture. They are so easy to produce in SketchUp, and the more I create, the faster I can produce a piece of furniture. Not only are they used to re-create various arcs, tapers, and shapes, but also in the layout of dovetails and other joinery, turnings, inlay design, the location of pins, dowels, nails, and screws, and hardware installation.</p><p>If I had to produce these templates using plywood, or other wood and plastic products, my use of full-size templates would substantially diminish, and I’d be less efficient in the shop. It just takes too much time with these materials. I find thick poster board to be the best material. I buy it at art stores where I can obtain a thicker paper product than is available in typical school-grade poster boards. Using poster board allows me to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes.</p> <p>Currently I’m building a Kitchen Dresser, circa 1750, with excellent bracket details and shapes. In fact, there are a number of beautiful shapes in this piece including the crown molding, scroll shapes in the sides and header, cutouts for the spoon rack, rounded feet, and dovetail joints. To re-create these shapes in the shop, full-size templates are critical.</p> <p>Here is a view of the overall SketchUp model:</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225863″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-700×769.png” alt=”Assembly 3″ width=”700″ height=”769″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-700×769.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-768×844.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3.png 810w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Here is a perspective view of the side component that includes many of the complex shapes.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225869″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150615/Side-Perspective.png” alt=”Side Perspective” width=”532″ height=”875″/></p> <p>And here are several of the templates needed in the shop – shown below in this order:</p> <ul><li>Crown Molding</li> <li>Foot</li> <li>Dovetails</li> <li>Middle Bracket in Side Component</li> <li>Spoon Rack</li> <li>Upper Bracket in Side Component</li> <li>Header</li> </ul><p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225864″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template.png” alt=”Crown Molding Template” width=”669″ height=”671″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template.png 669w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template-300×300.png 300w” sizes=”(max-width: 669px) 100vw, 669px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225865″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-700×167.png” alt=”Foot” width=”700″ height=”167″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-700×167.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-768×183.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-1200×286.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot.png 1462w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225867″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-700×310.png” alt=”Side Dovetails” width=”700″ height=”310″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-700×310.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-768×340.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails.png 1025w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225868″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-700×664.png” alt=”Side Middle Bracket” width=”700″ height=”664″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-700×664.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-768×729.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket.png 918w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225870″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-700×302.png” alt=”Spoon Rack” width=”700″ height=”302″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-700×302.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-768×331.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack.png 861w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225871″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-700×569.png” alt=”Upper Bracket Shapes” width=”700″ height=”569″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-700×569.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-768×624.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes.png 947w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225872″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-700×284.png” alt=”Upper Header” width=”700″ height=”284″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-700×284.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-768×311.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-1200×486.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header.png 1217w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>In the following video, I show how I produce templates in SketchUp with my home printer and 8 1/2 x 11 sheets. For my students, I use Layout and produce a PDF of full-size templates on large-scale paper. Thus students are not burdened with connecting multiple sheets of 8 1/2 x 11. But in my own work in the shop, I prefer printing on 8 1/2 x 11 sheets since the connecting of multiple sheets is quite easy and fast.</p> <p><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/8j7vGazbtzU?rel=0″ width=”560″ height=”315″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe></p> <p>And here is a short video showing how I use the printouts from SketchUp to make the full-size templates.</p> <p><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/DAIiLO1mEuw?rel=0″ width=”560″ height=”315″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe><br/>Tim</p> <p>@KillenWOOD</p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 08 Nov 2016 15:55:46 +0000 Tim Killen article Full-size Templates—A Unique Way – FineWoodworking Creating full size templates from SketchUp is easier than you think http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/07064010/Shape-Middle-Side-thumb-16×9.png summary_large_image Creating full size templates from SketchUp is easier than you think Full-size Templates—A Unique Way – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/07064010/Shape-Middle-Side-thumb-16×9.png @KillenWOOD en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way Cabinets Sketchup

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Full-size Templates—A Unique Way

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I produce a staggering number of full-size templates—sometimes exceeding a dozen for one piece of furniture. They are so easy to produce in SketchUp, and the more I create, the faster I can produce a piece of furniture. Not only are they used to re-create various arcs, tapers, and shapes, but also in the layout of dovetails and other joinery, turnings, inlay design, the location of pins, dowels, nails, and screws, and hardware installation.

If I had to produce these templates using plywood, or other wood and plastic products, my use of full-size templates would substantially diminish, and I’d be less efficient in the shop. It just takes too much time with these materials. I find thick poster board to be the best material. I buy it at art stores where I can obtain a thicker paper product than is available in typical school-grade poster boards. Using poster board allows me to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes.

Currently I’m building a Kitchen Dresser, circa 1750, with excellent bracket details and shapes. In fact, there are a number of beautiful shapes in this piece including the crown molding, scroll shapes in the sides and header, cutouts for the spoon rack, rounded feet, and dovetail joints. To re-create these shapes in the shop, full-size templates are critical.

Here is a view of the overall SketchUp model:

Assembly 3

Here is a perspective view of the side component that includes many of the complex shapes.

Side Perspective

And here are several of the templates needed in the shop – shown below in this order:

  • Crown Molding
  • Foot
  • Dovetails
  • Middle Bracket in Side Component
  • Spoon Rack
  • Upper Bracket in Side Component
  • Header

Crown Molding TemplateFootSide DovetailsSide Middle BracketSpoon RackUpper Bracket ShapesUpper Header

In the following video, I show how I produce templates in SketchUp with my home printer and 8 1/2 x 11 sheets. For my students, I use Layout and produce a PDF of full-size templates on large-scale paper. Thus students are not burdened with connecting multiple sheets of 8 1/2 x 11. But in my own work in the shop, I prefer printing on 8 1/2 x 11 sheets since the connecting of multiple sheets is quite easy and fast.

And here is a short video showing how I use the printouts from SketchUp to make the full-size templates.


Tim

@KillenWOOD

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Published at Tue, 08 Nov 2016 15:55:46 +0000

U7IgNP.png

Tongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen Dresser

Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this style of joinery, which also includes a 1/4-in. beaded edge. A paneled door would be a much safer design as it inherently allows for seasonal wood movement. To accommodate wood movement in the tongue-and-groove door is much more complicated. The joints cannot be glued and must be able to move, allowing the door width to expand and contract. As shown in the video below, I include 1/16-in. gaps at each joint and on the right and left edges. To maintain door integrity, horizontal and diagonal battens are connected to the back face of the door. The battens are attached with wood screws in slotted shank holes, again to allow for the seasonal movement.

Here is the dresser assembly with the door removed from its opening.

Door Removed

The back face of the door includes two horizontal battens and one diagonal batten held with wood screws in slotted shank holes (no glue).

Door Rear View

This shows the top edges of the assembled door and copies of the two components pulled out in front. You can see the 1/16-in. gaps in the tongue-and-groove joints.

Top View Door Components

Here is the video:

Here is the progress in the shop—all material is Monterey Pine.

IMG_5964

Tim

@KillenWOOD

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Published at Tue, 22 Nov 2016 05:01:34 +0000

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Display Cabinet on a Stand

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Joinery takes center stage in this cabinet-on-stand. The base and case are made with contrasting woods, but the straight grain of the riftsawn stock unifies the two. An apron and rail on each side of the case make for a strong, light-looking base. A wide upper front apron paired with a narrow lower rail accomplishes the same objective. The base is joined with through-mortise-and-tenons, lightened with tapers and curves. Latticework on the front door dresses up the dovetailed cabinet on top.

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View PDF

Get the Full-Size Plan

Printed and digital plans and a cutlist for this project are available in the Fine Woodworking store.

Buy The Plan

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Published at Fri, 02 Dec 2016 13:51:02 +0000

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