Cabinets – FineWoodworking

Cabinets – FineWoodworkingDisplay Cabinet on a StandTongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen DresserFull-size Templates—A Unique Way

http://www.finewoodworking.com Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226618 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034-700×394.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Joinery takes center stage in this cabinet-on-stand. The base and case are made with contrasting woods, but the straight grain of the riftsawn stock unifies the two. An apron and rail on each side of the case make for a strong, light-looking base. A wide upper front apron paired with a narrow lower rail accomplishes the same objective. The base is joined with through-mortise-and-tenons, lightened with tapers and curves. Latticework on the front door dresses up the dovetailed cabinet on top.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/226618/011259034.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <div class=”store-project__plan”><img class=”store-project__plan__image” src=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/app/uploads/uploadedimages/fine_woodworking_network/image_resources/in-house_ads/Project_Plans_th.jpg”/><div class=”store-project__plan__copy”> <div class=”store-project__plan__text” readability=”31.5″> <h5 class=”store-project__plan__heading”>Get the Full-Size Plan</h5> <div class=”store-project__plan__blurb” readability=”8″> <p>Printed and digital plans and a cutlist for this project are available in the Fine Woodworking store.</p> </div> </div> <a class=”store-project__plan__action” href=”https://www.tauntonstore.com/kumiko-cabinet-on-stand.html” target=”_blank”>Buy The Plan</a></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 02 Dec 2016 13:51:02 +0000 Michael Pekovich article Display Cabinet on a Stand – FineWoodworking Eye-catching details and contrasting woods make this a case to remember http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034.jpg summary_large_image Eye-catching details and contrasting woods make this a case to remember Display Cabinet on a Stand – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand Cabinets Cabinet-on-Stand http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226446 <p>Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this style of joinery, which also includes a 1/4-in. beaded edge. A paneled door would be a much safer design as it inherently allows for seasonal wood movement. To accommodate wood movement in the tongue-and-groove door is much more complicated. The joints cannot be glued and must be able to move, allowing the door width to expand and contract. As shown in the video below, I include 1/16-in. gaps at each joint and on the right and left edges. To maintain door integrity, horizontal and diagonal battens are connected to the back face of the door. The battens are attached with wood screws in slotted shank holes, again to allow for the seasonal movement.</p> <p>Here is the dresser assembly with the door removed from its opening.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226447″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-700×711.png” alt=”Door Removed” width=”700″ height=”711″/></p> <p>The back face of the door includes two horizontal battens and one diagonal batten held with wood screws in slotted shank holes (no glue).</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226501″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-700×749.png” alt=”Door Rear View” width=”700″ height=”749″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-700×749.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-768×822.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View.png 782w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>This shows the top edges of the assembled door and copies of the two components pulled out in front. You can see the 1/16-in. gaps in the tongue-and-groove joints.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226449″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-700×400.png” alt=”Top View Door Components” width=”700″ height=”400″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-700×400.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-768×439.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-1200×686.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components.png 1354w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Here is the video:</p> <p><iframe src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/tpPCxukDing” width=”560″ height=”314″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe></p> <p>Here is the progress in the shop—all material is Monterey Pine.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226502″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-700×933.jpg” alt=”IMG_5964″ width=”700″ height=”933″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-700×933.jpg 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-768×1024.jpg 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-1200×1600.jpg 1200w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Tim</p> <p>@KillenWOOD</p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 22 Nov 2016 05:01:34 +0000 article Tongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen Dresser – FineWoodworking Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this … http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-e1479821861598.png summary_large_image Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this […] Tongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen Dresser – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-e1479821861598.png @KillenWOOD en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser Cabinets http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=225862 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150555/Shape-Middle-Side-700×452.png” alt=”Article Image”/><p>I produce a staggering number of full-size templates—sometimes exceeding a dozen for one piece of furniture. They are so easy to produce in SketchUp, and the more I create, the faster I can produce a piece of furniture. Not only are they used to re-create various arcs, tapers, and shapes, but also in the layout of dovetails and other joinery, turnings, inlay design, the location of pins, dowels, nails, and screws, and hardware installation.</p><p>If I had to produce these templates using plywood, or other wood and plastic products, my use of full-size templates would substantially diminish, and I’d be less efficient in the shop. It just takes too much time with these materials. I find thick poster board to be the best material. I buy it at art stores where I can obtain a thicker paper product than is available in typical school-grade poster boards. Using poster board allows me to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes.</p> <p>Currently I’m building a Kitchen Dresser, circa 1750, with excellent bracket details and shapes. In fact, there are a number of beautiful shapes in this piece including the crown molding, scroll shapes in the sides and header, cutouts for the spoon rack, rounded feet, and dovetail joints. To re-create these shapes in the shop, full-size templates are critical.</p> <p>Here is a view of the overall SketchUp model:</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225863″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-700×769.png” alt=”Assembly 3″ width=”700″ height=”769″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-700×769.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-768×844.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3.png 810w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Here is a perspective view of the side component that includes many of the complex shapes.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225869″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150615/Side-Perspective.png” alt=”Side Perspective” width=”532″ height=”875″/></p> <p>And here are several of the templates needed in the shop – shown below in this order:</p> <ul><li>Crown Molding</li> <li>Foot</li> <li>Dovetails</li> <li>Middle Bracket in Side Component</li> <li>Spoon Rack</li> <li>Upper Bracket in Side Component</li> <li>Header</li> </ul><p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225864″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template.png” alt=”Crown Molding Template” width=”669″ height=”671″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template.png 669w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template-300×300.png 300w” sizes=”(max-width: 669px) 100vw, 669px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225865″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-700×167.png” alt=”Foot” width=”700″ height=”167″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-700×167.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-768×183.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-1200×286.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot.png 1462w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225867″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-700×310.png” alt=”Side Dovetails” width=”700″ height=”310″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-700×310.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-768×340.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails.png 1025w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225868″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-700×664.png” alt=”Side Middle Bracket” width=”700″ height=”664″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-700×664.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-768×729.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket.png 918w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225870″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-700×302.png” alt=”Spoon Rack” width=”700″ height=”302″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-700×302.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-768×331.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack.png 861w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225871″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-700×569.png” alt=”Upper Bracket Shapes” width=”700″ height=”569″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-700×569.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-768×624.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes.png 947w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225872″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-700×284.png” alt=”Upper Header” width=”700″ height=”284″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-700×284.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-768×311.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-1200×486.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header.png 1217w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>In the following video, I show how I produce templates in SketchUp with my home printer and 8 1/2 x 11 sheets. For my students, I use Layout and produce a PDF of full-size templates on large-scale paper. Thus students are not burdened with connecting multiple sheets of 8 1/2 x 11. But in my own work in the shop, I prefer printing on 8 1/2 x 11 sheets since the connecting of multiple sheets is quite easy and fast.</p> <p><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/8j7vGazbtzU?rel=0″ width=”560″ height=”315″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe></p> <p>And here is a short video showing how I use the printouts from SketchUp to make the full-size templates.</p> <p><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/DAIiLO1mEuw?rel=0″ width=”560″ height=”315″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe><br/>Tim</p> <p>@KillenWOOD</p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 08 Nov 2016 15:55:46 +0000 Tim Killen article Full-size Templates—A Unique Way – FineWoodworking Creating full size templates from SketchUp is easier than you think http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/07064010/Shape-Middle-Side-thumb-16×9.png summary_large_image Creating full size templates from SketchUp is easier than you think Full-size Templates—A Unique Way – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/07064010/Shape-Middle-Side-thumb-16×9.png @KillenWOOD en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way Cabinets Sketchup

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Workbenches – FineWoodworking

Workbenches – FineWoodworkingMike Pekovich’s Go-To Work Holding Jigs6 Essential Bench JigsAssembling the small, sturdy workbench

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fftr.fivefilters.org%2Fmakefulltextfeed.php%3Furl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.finewoodworking.com%252Fcategory%252Fworkbenches%252Ffeed%252F%26max%3D5&max=5 Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/02/mike-pekovichs-go-work-holding-jigs http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=225764 <div><img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/02053321/peko-work-holding-wp.jpg” class=”ff-og-image-inserted”/></div><li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”1.9621212121212″> <p>Hi Mike. Great video. Quick question- if you want to flatten a rough wide board (which typically means starting across the grain), how do you handle that? Do you have a work holding jig? Or do you just take it to the shop’s massive jointer? 😜</p> </li><li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”-0.87878787878788″> <p>I 3rd tgello’s comments above! Thanks Mike for being such a great teacher!</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”7.6756756756757″> <p>unfortunately my vice is on the other end because of workshop layout, so do I,</p><p>become a molly dooka,</p><p>make new bench</p><p>sell hand tools, rely on machinery,</p><p>stick to turning only, sell everything</p><p>cheers</p><p>konrad</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”11.872453498671″> <p>Great presentation of jigs that are pretty much indispensable. I would like to make make some suggestions, however, that I think might make a couple of the jigs more versatile. On the shooting boards, the bed on which the work rests needs be only at or slightly higher than the lower edge of the blade, or about 1/4″ above the bench or ramp of the shooting board, rather than the 1/2″ that appears here. This maximizes the width of the blade. Tempered hardboard or fin-ply is good for this; 1/4″ MDF is too soft and will wear quickly. In the same vein, the height of the stop should be the full width of the blade; while you may usually only do narrow pieces, this gives you the option of doing wider ones if you need to. If you find yourself doing a lot of thin pieces, it is often helpful to use a sloping ramp on the shooting board: this gives a slightly more shearing cut, but mainly extends the wear area on the blade from what ends up quickly being a notch to a slightly wider area, thus extending time between sharpenings. It’s also nice to chamfer the back edge of the stop as it chips out too.</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”3.7894736842105″> <p>Fantastic! Thank you for sharing your knowledge with the rest of us. There is no way to thank you for the fingers you just saved on the small parts jig, quick, easy, and fast. A lot of information in a well presented video. Thanks again.</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”0.95045045045045″> <p>Yes, terrific presentation. One aspect of my job is teaching people how to make presentations. You couldn’t have done it better. And I can use everyone one of the jigs. I’m headed to the shop now.</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”0″> <p>Thank you for a great lesson. Especially like the jig for cutting little pieces of wood. Glad you couldn’t see me doing it before I saw this jig.</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”-0.75471698113208″> <p>Thanks for the tips Mike!</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”3.8575667655786″> <p>Thanks Mike, I also enjoy your way of teaching. I have enjoyed your video on handplanes it taught me a lot things I was not aware of. You do have a talent for keeping it simple, yet explaining it in a way that it does not seem technical when it is. I hope you will continue to create more video’s. Thanks again</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”-0.89565217391304″> <p>Yes — superbly well-done: not a word wasted; always specific. Kudos — and thank you.</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”-0.90277777777778″> <p>Great teacher. Not one ounce of fat in this video.</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”0″> <p>Thank you Mike for a fantastic demonstration of your jigs. You make it look so easy and with those jigs hopefully it will be.</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”-0.921875″> <p>I second tgello’s comment above. Thanks Mike!</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”0.97333333333333″> <p>This guy is a great teacher. His explanation is simplified for us newbies and without the pompous attitude. I listened to him on a recent podcast and it was enjoyable to sit and listen to him. Thanks Mike.</p> </li> <li class=”comments__list-item” readability=”-0.82089552238806″> <p>great video. super ideas/jigs. thank you!</p> </li> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 02 Nov 2016 13:33:50 +0000 Michael Pekovich article Mike Pekovich’s Go-To Work Holding Jigs – FineWoodworking See Mike Pekovich’s essential bench jigs in use, and hear why he considers them an integral part of his workflow http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/02/mike-pekovichs-go-work-holding-jigs http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/02053321/peko-work-holding-wp.jpg summary_large_image See Mike Pekovich’s essential bench jigs in use, and hear why he considers them an integral part of his workflow Mike Pekovich’s Go-To Work Holding Jigs – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/02053321/peko-work-holding-wp.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/02/mike-pekovichs-go-work-holding-jigs Hand Tools Woodworking Jigs Workbenches http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/02/6-essential-bench-jigs http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=225588 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/10/27121846/011258050_01-bench-jigs-700×477.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>One of the secrets to hand-tool success is keeping the workpiece from moving as you work on it. While clamping a piece in a vise or to the benchtop can work, often it’s overkill. Not only that, but clamping and unclamping adds a lot of time to the process. A better method is to use a planing stop or saw hook, which take advantage of the cutting force of the tool to keep the workpiece in place.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/225588/011258050.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 02 Nov 2016 13:09:10 +0000 Michael Pekovich article 6 Essential Bench Jigs – FineWoodworking Planing stops and saw hooks add speed and accuracy to your handwork http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/02/6-essential-bench-jigs http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/10/27121846/011258050_01-bench-jigs.jpg summary_large_image Planing stops and saw hooks add speed and accuracy to your handwork 6 Essential Bench Jigs – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/10/27121846/011258050_01-bench-jigs.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/02/6-essential-bench-jigs Accessories Woodworking Jigs Workbenches http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/01/assembling-the-small-sturdy-workbench http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=225757 <p><em>[unable to retrieve full-text content]</em></p><p><em>[unable to retrieve full-text content]</em></p><p><em>[unable to retrieve full-text content]</em></p><p><em>[unable to retrieve full-text content]</em></p>Matt Kenney demonstrates how the clever interlocking joinery in Eric Tan’s rock-solid workbench allows it to break down for transport Tue, 01 Nov 2016 15:59:48 +0000 Matt Kenney article Assembling the small, sturdy workbench – FineWoodworking Matt Kenney demonstrates how the clever interlocking joinery in Eric Tan’s rock-solid workbench allows it to break down for transport http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/01/assembling-the-small-sturdy-workbench http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/01074455/knockdown-bench.jpg summary_large_image Matt Kenney demonstrates how the clever interlocking joinery in Eric Tan’s rock-solid workbench allows it to break down for transport Assembling the small, sturdy workbench – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/01074455/knockdown-bench.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/01/assembling-the-small-sturdy-workbench Workbenches Knock-down Portable

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Chairs, Benches And Stools – FineWoodworking

Chairs, Benches And Stools – FineWoodworkingMuseum benchBuild a Simple StoolHow I Make a Rocker

http://www.finewoodworking.com/category/chairs-benches-and-stools/feed/ Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/museum-bench http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226744 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114944/011259032-700×394.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Simple but not boring was the goal for this bench, which incorporates two tilted planes for the seat and wide, solid legs pierced with a keyhole slot at the center. Hurwitz refined the design in scale models and made a one-seat mockup to test the seat for comfort before he and his assistant built the real thing out of red elm.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/226744/011259032.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 02 Dec 2016 13:51:15 +0000 article Museum bench – FineWoodworking Simple but not boring was the goal for this bench, which incorporates two tilted planes for the seat and wide, solid legs pierced with a keyhole slot at the center http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/museum-bench http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114944/011259032.jpg summary_large_image Simple but not boring was the goal for this bench, which incorporates two tilted planes for the seat and wide, solid legs pierced with a keyhole slot at the center Museum bench – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114944/011259032.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/museum-bench Chairs, Benches And Stools Design http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/07/27/build-a-simple-stool http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2016/07/27/build-a-simple-stool <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05201438/011256058_build-a-simple-stool-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Each of Fabian Fischer’s stools has its own character. He makes them with hand tools from a variety of woods and leaves the tool marks that make them unique. Here he builds a comfortable stool sized to sit at a workbench. Simply change the height for different uses. You’ll learn how to shape the seat, form the legs and stretchers, including their mortises and tenons, and assemble the stool.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/2508/011256058.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 27 Jul 2016 04:00:00 +0000 Fabian Fischer article Build a Simple Stool – FineWoodworking Fast, fun approach to making a comfortable, casual seat http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/07/27/build-a-simple-stool http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05201438/011256058_build-a-simple-stool-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Fast, fun approach to making a comfortable, casual seat Build a Simple Stool – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05201438/011256058_build-a-simple-stool-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/07/27/build-a-simple-stool Chairs, Benches And Stools Stools http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/02/10/how-i-make-a-rocker http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2016/02/10/how-i-make-a-rocker <!– video –> <figure class=”article__image–main”><img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05201106/011253082_maloof-rocker-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/></figure><p>Take a look back at this classic article from FWW #42, in which the celebrated furniture maker Sam Maloof explains how he makes his timeless rocker designs.</p> <!– Module CTA (Contains Email Form) –> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span> </div> <!– /__form –> </div> <!– /__cta –> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/20140/011253082.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <!– Review –> <!– Embedded Related Articles –> <!– Modal Slideshow –> <!– In-read –> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 10 Feb 2016 05:00:00 +0000 Sam Maloof article How I Make a Rocker – FineWoodworking <span style=”font-size: 10pt”>Take a look back at this classic article from FWW #42, in which the celebrated furniture maker Sam Maloof explains how he makes his timeless rocker designs.</span> http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/02/10/how-i-make-a-rocker http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05201106/011253082_maloof-rocker-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image <span style=”font-size: 10pt”>Take a look back at this classic article from FWW #42, in which the celebrated furniture maker Sam Maloof explains how he makes his timeless rocker designs.</span> How I Make a Rocker – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05201106/011253082_maloof-rocker-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/02/10/how-i-make-a-rocker Carving Chairs, Benches And Stools Carving – Sculptural Chairs – Rocking

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Beds – FineWoodworking

Beds – FineWoodworkingFree Furniture Plans from the Pages of Fine WoodworkingTwo Techniques for Bed-Bolt AlignmentBuild a Beautiful Bed

http://www.finewoodworking.com/category/beds/feed Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/15/free-furniture-plans-from-the-pages-of-fine-woodworking http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/15/free-furniture-plans-from-the-pages-of-fine-woodworking <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200259/hack-long-planes-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Our collection of six free woodworking plans offers a variety of furniture articles from the pages of <em>Fine Woodworking</em> magazine—from coffee tables and beds, to a classic six-board chest, and even a dedicated sharpening station for hand tool enthusiasts—you’re sure to find a woodworking project that inspires.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <div class=”owl-carousel off”> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”7.9746835443038″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200257/harvest-table-becksvoort_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”11.518987341772″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/107271/terrific-table-plans”>5 Plans for Terrific Tables</a></p> <p>We’ve made a small selection of our most popular members-only plan articles totally free. From Shaker dining and harvest tables, to a folding vineyard table that’s simple to store, we’ve got you covered.</p> </div> </div> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”7.3754646840149″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200258/rodriguez-coffee-table_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”10.14126394052″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/57705/free-plan-mahogany-coffee-table”>Mahogany Coffee Table</a></p> <p>Designed in the Scandinavian style by Mario Rodgriguez, this coffee table features legs with bandsawn arches shaped by spokeshaves and other hand tools. The legs are joined by stretchers that support a floating top, which features breadboard ends.</p> </div> </div> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”7.3846153846154″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200258/miller-shaker-bed_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”10.153846153846″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/2127/free-plan-build-a-shaker-style-bed”>Classic Shaker Bed</a></p> <p>In this 16-page excerpt from furniture pro Jeff Miller’s book, Beds, Miller outlines the construction of this contemporary full-size bed based the common construction elements used in traditional Shaker furniture.</p> </div> </div> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”6.4903846153846″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200258/sharpening-station_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”8.6538461538462″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/22474/free-plan-a-dedicated-sharpening-station”>Dedicated Sharpening Station</a></p> <p>Hand tool woodworker Tom Fidgen guides readers through the construction of a dedicated sharpening bench in this eight-part series. Follow along and download the free project plan.</p> </div> </div> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”5.9613259668508″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200259/dunbar-six-chest_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”7.3370165745856″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/13139/free-plan-six-board-chest”>Six-Board Chest</a></p> <p>Windsor chair maker Mike Dunbar’s six-board chest is a faithful reproduction of an 18th-century original. It’s the perfect project to hone your hand tool skills.</p> </div> </div> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”6.9705882352941″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200259/splay-leg-table_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”9.2941176470588″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/35234/free-woodworking-plan-build-a-splay-legged-table”>Splay-Legged Table</a></p> <p>With subtle details like cockbeading around the underside of all four aprons and an under-beveled top that fools the eye into thinking it’s thinner and lighter than it really is, Garrett Hack’s Splay-Legged Table oozes gracefulness.</p> </div> </div> </div> <button class=”button__carousel-trigger js-carousel-trigger”>Launch Slideshow</button> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 15 May 2015 21:02:06 +0000 article Free Furniture Plans from the Pages of Fine Woodworking – FineWoodworking Six furniture plans from the pages of Fine Woodworking http://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/15/free-furniture-plans-from-the-pages-of-fine-woodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200300/hack-long-planes-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Six furniture plans from the pages of Fine Woodworking Free Furniture Plans from the Pages of Fine Woodworking – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200300/hack-long-planes-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/15/free-furniture-plans-from-the-pages-of-fine-woodworking Beds Casework Workbenches http://www.finewoodworking.com/2012/11/20/two-techniques-for-bed-bolt-alignment http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2012/11/20/two-techniques-for-bed-bolt-alignment <p>If you read Martin McClendon’s article about making a <a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/articles/article.aspx?id=125714″ title=”Greene and Greene: Master the Details”>Greene and Greene bed</a> in <em>Fine Woodworking</em> #231 (Feb. 2013), you might have asked yourself how he lined up the hole in the bed rail for the bed bolt with the hole for the barrel nut. That’s a great question, because it can be hard to do. Here are two different ways to do it, and both work equally well. Regardless of which one you choose to use, start by drilling the couterbore and clearance hole in the leg (both at the drill press), then put the leg on the bed rail tenon and use a handheld drill to make the bed bolt hole in the bed rail. (The leg acts as a guide to keep the hole as perpendicular to the rail’s end as possible.) Drill as deep as you can, take the leg off, and then finish the hole. Now you’re ready for a jig.<br/></p> <h3>The notch in Christian Becksvoort’s jig allows you to quickly mark the centerpoint of the barrel nut’s hole.</h3> <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192100/011196092_01.jpg” alt=””/><p><strong>The notch in Christian Becksvoort’s jig allows you to quickly mark the centerpoint of the barrel nut’s hole.</strong></p> <p>Insert a bolt into the stretcher, and the jig hugs the bolt to align itself with the hole you drilled. The jig’s dimensions are determined by the length of the bolt you use and the thickness of the post.Make the jig from scrap. Two tabs on the underside, equal in length to the thickness of the post minus the counterbore for the bolt head, will straddle the bolt.</p> <p><a href=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192101/011196092_02_xl.jpg”><img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192101/011196092_02.jpg” alt=””/></a><br/>Designate a front end of the jig, insert the bolt between the tabs, then mark and cut a notch in the front edge at the point where the bolt protrudes. In use, the notch will be aligned over the bolt’s centerline, and halfway along the threaded area. Mark the stretcher at the notch to establish the nut-mortise location.</p> <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192101/011196092_03.jpg” alt=””/><br/>Using a square, mark in the mortise dimensions, then drill and chisel out the mortise. Repeat the process for the remaining bed bolts. <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192101/011196092_04.jpg” alt=””/><h3>On Mike Pekovich’s jig, the edge of the block represents the centerline of the bolt hole. Measure along the edge to locate the nut hole’s centerpoint, then you can quickly find it’s centerpoint on the bed rail.</h3> <p><strong>On Mike Pekovich’s jig, the edge of the block represents the centerline of the bolt hole. Measure along the edge to locate the nut hole’s centerpoint, then you can quickly find it’s centerpoint on the bed rail.</strong></p> <p>I drill the bed-bolt hole into the end of the bed rail as straight as I can, but you don’t need to drill the hole precisely at 90° to get the holes for the bed bolt and its nut to intersect precisely. Then, with a dowel and a simple layout jig, I locate the centerline of the hole and the center of the bed-bolt nut.</p> <p><a href=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192102/align-bed-bolts-01_xl.jpg”><img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192102/align-bed-bolts-01.jpg” alt=””/></a><br/>The jig consists of an 1/8-in.-thick hardboard piece glued into a kerf cut in block of wood. The kerf is set in from the edge of the block at half the diameter of the bed-bolt hole.</p> <p><a href=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192102/align-bed-bolts-02_xl.jpg”><img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192102/align-bed-bolts-02.jpg” alt=””/></a><br/>I insert a dowel the size of the hole in the bed rail, then snug up the jig against the dowel. The edge of the guide block gives me the bolt hole centerline, which I draw on the inside face of the rail. Along this line, I locate the center of the hole for the bed-bolt nut. This guarantees good results even if the bolt hole is off a few degrees.</p> <a href=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192103/align-bed-bolts-03_xl.jpg”><img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192102/align-bed-bolts-03.jpg” alt=””/></a> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 21 Nov 2012 02:03:10 +0000 Matt Kenney article Two Techniques for Bed-Bolt Alignment – FineWoodworking Learn how two simple jigs can make installing bed bolts a breeze http://www.finewoodworking.com/2012/11/20/two-techniques-for-bed-bolt-alignment http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192108/011231032_greene-greene-bed-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Learn how two simple jigs can make installing bed bolts a breeze Two Techniques for Bed-Bolt Alignment – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192108/011231032_greene-greene-bed-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2012/11/20/two-techniques-for-bed-bolt-alignment Beds Construction Installing Hardware http://www.finewoodworking.com/2008/09/18/build-a-beautiful-bed http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2008/09/18/build-a-beautiful-bed <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153551/011184034-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Building a bed means working large-scale, with long rails, wide headboard assemblies, tall posts. The four projects shown here, made by some of the best woodworkers in the country, can help you cut that work down to size. They feature clear, helpful instructions and detailed drawings. You can also order complete plans for two of these projects from our plan store. Take a look:</p><table class=”show_design_border” cellspacing=”10″ cellpadding=”10″ width=”100%” bgcolor=”#F4E4B3″><tbody readability=”8.1960784313726″><tr readability=”7.5055350553506″><td><img title=”” height=”148″ alt=”” src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153549/011184034_sm.jpg” width=”115″ align=”left” border=”0″/> </td> <td readability=”7.4888059701493″> <p><a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=25401″ target=”_self”>A Pencil-Post Bed</a><br/><em>by Lonnie Bird<br/></em>Figured wood, subtle details, and a rich finish bring charm and elegance to this traditional design. <strong>Plus:</strong> Watch a <a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/Gallery/GalleryImage.aspx?id=25466″ target=”_self”>video</a> with Lonnie Bird describing the bed’s design and construction details. You can also <a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://store.taunton.com/onlinestore/item/pencil-post-bed-project-plan-011052.html” target=”_blank”>order a full-sized plan</a>.</p> </td> </tr><tr readability=”3.45″><td><img title=”” height=”85″ alt=”” src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153549/011156044_sm.jpg” width=”115″ align=”left” border=”0″/> </td> <td readability=”4.5762711864407″> <p><a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2787″ target=”_self”>Arts and Crafts Bed</a><br/><em>by Gary Rogowski<br/></em>An <em>FWW</em> contributing editor shows you how to use a router to create smooth curves and tight joinery. You can also <a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://store.taunton.com/onlinestore/item/arts-and-crafts-bed-project-plan-011054.html” target=”_blank”>order a full-sized plan</a>. </p> </td> </tr><tr readability=”8.2588235294118″><td><img title=”” height=”134″ alt=”” src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153550/011113042_sm.jpg” width=”115″ align=”left” border=”0″/> </td> <td readability=”8.25″> <p><a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2357″ target=”_self”>Making a Sheraton Bed</a><br/><em>by Philip C. Lowe<br/></em>This award-winning woodworker shows you how to handle the most challenging part of this period-furniture piece–the posts. He explains how to make the blanks, turn and reed them, and put everything together. </p> </td> </tr><tr readability=”5.4230769230769″><td><img title=”” height=”124″ alt=”” src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153551/011197083-build-a-sleigh-bed_sm.jpg” width=”115″ align=”left” border=”0″/> </td> <td readability=”6.3190661478599″> <p><a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=30244″ target=”_self”>New Twist on a Sleigh Bed</a><br/><em>by Charles Shackleton<br/></em>X-shaped back slats and hand-carved curls on the legs link this bed to furniture that Shackleton designed as an homage to fork-back chairs of his native Ireland. Jigs and templates simplify the construction .</p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Thu, 18 Sep 2008 04:00:00 +0000 Fine Woodworking editors article Build a Beautiful Bed – FineWoodworking Here’s a portfolio of project ideas from FWW experts. All with step-by-step instructions that show you how to handle the trickiest parts of construction. Complete project plans are also available. http://www.finewoodworking.com/2008/09/18/build-a-beautiful-bed http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153552/011184034-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Here’s a portfolio of project ideas from FWW experts. All with step-by-step instructions that show you how to handle the trickiest parts of construction. Complete project plans are also available. Build a Beautiful Bed – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153552/011184034-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2008/09/18/build-a-beautiful-bed Beds Beds – Other

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Breadboard ends in SketchUp – Cutting Board Part 2

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In my last blog, I showed the first phase of constructing the Cutting Board for an undermount kitchen sink. I showed the development of the two main components – the center section and the two breadboard ends. In this blog, I finalize the construction by creating the joinery.

There are many advantages to having breadboards in an application like this, but this complicates the joinery. The breadboard grain direction is at right angles to the mid section, therefore creating a cross-grain issue with wood movement. The breadboard ends must allow expansion and contraction of the center section, otherwise creating cracks. To allow this relative movement, the breadboards are not glued full length, rather fastened with screws (in this case) that can adjust within slots, rather than tight shank holes. I glue in the center tenon only.

Here is the exploded model (in back edges format) showing the detail joinery.

Exploded

The following video shows the detail joinery to allow this flexibility and relative movement of the components.

Tim    @KillenWOOD

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Published at Thu, 26 Jan 2017 14:29:22 +0000

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Built-ins – FineWoodworking

Built-ins – FineWoodworkingOxford Inspiration for Homemade BalustradeA Short History of Built-in Furniture

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fftr.fivefilters.org%2Fmakefulltextfeed.php%3Furl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.finewoodworking.com%252Fcategory%252Fbuilt-ins%252Ffeed%252F%26max%3D5&max=5 Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2008/04/21/oxford-inspiration-for-homemade-balustrade http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2008/04/21/oxford-inspiration-for-homemade-balustrade <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153053/99930220-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>A balustrade at Christ Church Cathedral in Oxford, England, captured Fred Ziegler’s imagination when he studied there in the 1960s. The <a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Christ_Church_Cathedral_nave.jpg” target=”_blank”>interlocking arches</a> intrigued him and the design rattled around in his brain for years. Decades later, he finally excised the pattern by incorporating it into a <a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153051/99930220_02_xl.jpg” target=”_blank”>balcony</a> in his new timber-framed home.</p><p>Ziegler crafted the columns from reclaimed 100-year-old factory beams made of Douglas fir. He turned the arch segments on a 36-in. faceplate lathe. The challenge was to adapt the original limestone design to wood and master the geometry of the intersecting arches. Watch the slideshow (click on the button above) for details on how he completed the project.</p> <p><a href=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153051/99930220_01_xl.jpg” target=”_blank”><img title=”Old Cook’s Mill” align=”left” alt=”Old Cook’s Mill” src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153051/99930220_01.jpg” border=”0″ vspace=”5″ hspace=”5″/></a>The balustrade is just one of many notable fixtures on Ziegler’s property. He and his wife retired to West Virginia and bought an 1857-era water-powered mill (left). They’ve since worked to turn the <a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.cooksoldmill.com/index.html” target=”_blank”>Old Cook’s Mill</a>  into a center for traditional crafts. They installed woodworking equipment in the mill itself, set up a forge building for metal work, and are preparing another outbuilding for weaving. Ziegler houses his collection of antique woodworking tools in a fourth outbuilding.</p> <p><em>Photos: </em><em>Steve Brightwell, Beckley, W Va.</em></p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/32794/30220.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Mon, 21 Apr 2008 04:00:00 +0000 Fred Ziegler article Oxford Inspiration for Homemade Balustrade – FineWoodworking See an intricate balustrade come together using a shopmade lathe and reclaimed Douglas fir http://www.finewoodworking.com/2008/04/21/oxford-inspiration-for-homemade-balustrade http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153054/99930220-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image See an intricate balustrade come together using a shopmade lathe and reclaimed Douglas fir Oxford Inspiration for Homemade Balustrade – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153054/99930220-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2008/04/21/oxford-inspiration-for-homemade-balustrade Built-ins Turning Faceplate Turning http://www.finewoodworking.com/2005/09/12/a-short-history-of-built-in-furniture http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2005/09/12/a-short-history-of-built-in-furniture <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05152011/IMG568-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Although strictly an oxymoron, since by definition “furniture” in the woodworking sense is generally understood to refer to movable pieces, the term <a class=”link-dark” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2878″>built-in furniture</a> may be taken to mean fixed architectural elements that provide the same function as their movable namesakes. Sometimes, indeed, the term may refer to a separate piece of furniture that has been fixed in place and which now employs part of the surrounding architecture as an integral part of its construction, such as a wall that forms the back of a built-in cabinet.</p><p>The concept is not new, the earliest examples being wall benches, settles, and aumbries that date back to the Middle Ages, all originally built as architectural features, but which subsequently developed into stand-alone pieces of furniture.</p> <p>Examples of contemporary furniture that may be usefully designed as built-in furniture include various shelving (see <a class=”link-dark” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignAllAbout.aspx?id=3030″>Cupboards</a>), beds, benches, bookcases, cabinets, mirrors, and entertainment centers. <a class=”link-dark” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2543″>Fireplace mantels</a> can also be categorized as built-in furniture, in the sense that these can be constructed with the same joinery and tool techniques as a free-standing piece of furniture.</p> <p>Note that some built-in furniture can by definition only exist as such, for example, window seats and closets.</p> <p><em>Graham Blackburn is a furniture maker, author, and illustrator, and publisher of Blackburn Books (www.blackburnbooks.com) in Bearsville, N.Y.</em></p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Mon, 12 Sep 2005 04:00:00 +0000 Graham Blackburn article A Short History of Built-in Furniture – FineWoodworking Although strictly an oxymoron, since by definition “furniture” in the woodworking sense is generally understood to refer to movable pieces, the term built-in furniture may be taken to mean fixed architectural elements … http://www.finewoodworking.com/2005/09/12/a-short-history-of-built-in-furniture http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05152013/IMG568-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Although strictly an oxymoron, since by definition “furniture” in the woodworking sense is generally understood to refer to movable pieces, the term built-in furniture may be taken to mean fixed architectural elements […] A Short History of Built-in Furniture – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05152013/IMG568-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2005/09/12/a-short-history-of-built-in-furniture Built-ins Mantels

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Shaker Classic, 2 Ways

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These two Shaker tables are of basically the same design, with one major difference. The simple decision of whether to make tapered square legs or turned ones alters the whole feel of the table. The rest of the construction is standard mortise-and-tenon joinery, a dovetailed top rail, and a dovetailed drawer. A simple tapering jig makes quick work of the square legs, while the turned ones require a lathe and add a bit more of a challenge.

From Fine Woodworking #210

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Published at Sun, 01 Jan 2017 04:00:00 +0000

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The Enfield Cupboard, Updated

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Modeled after a small cupboard originally made at a Shaker Colony in Enfield, Conn., this cabinet’s simple, clean lines give it a refined, country look. Matt Kenney modified the original design, making the face frames narrower and adding two interior drawers. Construction is straightforward, with a dovetailed case and a frame-and-panel door, but there are a few quirks to the design that make this project even more fun—tall sides that make dovetail layout a challenge, for one, and shopmade edge details and trim.

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Published at Wed, 30 Sep 2015 04:00:00 +0000

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