Beds – FineWoodworking

Beds – FineWoodworkingFree Furniture Plans from the Pages of Fine WoodworkingTwo Techniques for Bed-Bolt AlignmentBuild a Beautiful Bed

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fftr.fivefilters.org%2Fmakefulltextfeed.php%3Furl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.finewoodworking.com%252Fcategory%252Fbeds%252Ffeed%26max%3D5&max=5 Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/15/free-furniture-plans-from-the-pages-of-fine-woodworking http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/15/free-furniture-plans-from-the-pages-of-fine-woodworking <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200259/hack-long-planes-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Our collection of six free woodworking plans offers a variety of furniture articles from the pages of <em>Fine Woodworking</em> magazine—from coffee tables and beds, to a classic six-board chest, and even a dedicated sharpening station for hand tool enthusiasts—you’re sure to find a woodworking project that inspires.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <div class=”owl-carousel off”> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”7.9746835443038″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200257/harvest-table-becksvoort_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”11.518987341772″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/107271/terrific-table-plans”>5 Plans for Terrific Tables</a></p> <p>We’ve made a small selection of our most popular members-only plan articles totally free. From Shaker dining and harvest tables, to a folding vineyard table that’s simple to store, we’ve got you covered.</p> </div> </div> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”7.3754646840149″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200258/rodriguez-coffee-table_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”10.14126394052″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/57705/free-plan-mahogany-coffee-table”>Mahogany Coffee Table</a></p> <p>Designed in the Scandinavian style by Mario Rodgriguez, this coffee table features legs with bandsawn arches shaped by spokeshaves and other hand tools. The legs are joined by stretchers that support a floating top, which features breadboard ends.</p> </div> </div> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”7.3846153846154″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200258/miller-shaker-bed_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”10.153846153846″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/2127/free-plan-build-a-shaker-style-bed”>Classic Shaker Bed</a></p> <p>In this 16-page excerpt from furniture pro Jeff Miller’s book, Beds, Miller outlines the construction of this contemporary full-size bed based the common construction elements used in traditional Shaker furniture.</p> </div> </div> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”6.4903846153846″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200258/sharpening-station_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”8.6538461538462″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/22474/free-plan-a-dedicated-sharpening-station”>Dedicated Sharpening Station</a></p> <p>Hand tool woodworker Tom Fidgen guides readers through the construction of a dedicated sharpening bench in this eight-part series. Follow along and download the free project plan.</p> </div> </div> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”5.9613259668508″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200259/dunbar-six-chest_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”7.3370165745856″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/13139/free-plan-six-board-chest”>Six-Board Chest</a></p> <p>Windsor chair maker Mike Dunbar’s six-board chest is a faithful reproduction of an 18th-century original. It’s the perfect project to hone your hand tool skills.</p> </div> </div> <div class=”modal__slide” readability=”6.9705882352941″> <div class=”modal__slide–left”><img class=”lazyload” data-src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200259/splay-leg-table_mdsq.jpg”/></div> <div class=”modal__slide–right” readability=”9.2941176470588″> <h3/> <p><a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/item/35234/free-woodworking-plan-build-a-splay-legged-table”>Splay-Legged Table</a></p> <p>With subtle details like cockbeading around the underside of all four aprons and an under-beveled top that fools the eye into thinking it’s thinner and lighter than it really is, Garrett Hack’s Splay-Legged Table oozes gracefulness.</p> </div> </div> </div> <button class=”button__carousel-trigger js-carousel-trigger”>Launch Slideshow</button> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 15 May 2015 21:02:06 +0000 article Free Furniture Plans from the Pages of Fine Woodworking – FineWoodworking Six furniture plans from the pages of Fine Woodworking http://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/15/free-furniture-plans-from-the-pages-of-fine-woodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200300/hack-long-planes-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Six furniture plans from the pages of Fine Woodworking Free Furniture Plans from the Pages of Fine Woodworking – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200300/hack-long-planes-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/15/free-furniture-plans-from-the-pages-of-fine-woodworking Beds Casework Workbenches http://www.finewoodworking.com/2012/11/20/two-techniques-for-bed-bolt-alignment http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2012/11/20/two-techniques-for-bed-bolt-alignment <p>If you read Martin McClendon’s article about making a <a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/articles/article.aspx?id=125714″ title=”Greene and Greene: Master the Details”>Greene and Greene bed</a> in <em>Fine Woodworking</em> #231 (Feb. 2013), you might have asked yourself how he lined up the hole in the bed rail for the bed bolt with the hole for the barrel nut. That’s a great question, because it can be hard to do. Here are two different ways to do it, and both work equally well. Regardless of which one you choose to use, start by drilling the couterbore and clearance hole in the leg (both at the drill press), then put the leg on the bed rail tenon and use a handheld drill to make the bed bolt hole in the bed rail. (The leg acts as a guide to keep the hole as perpendicular to the rail’s end as possible.) Drill as deep as you can, take the leg off, and then finish the hole. Now you’re ready for a jig.<br/></p> <h3>The notch in Christian Becksvoort’s jig allows you to quickly mark the centerpoint of the barrel nut’s hole.</h3> <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192100/011196092_01.jpg” alt=””/><p><strong>The notch in Christian Becksvoort’s jig allows you to quickly mark the centerpoint of the barrel nut’s hole.</strong></p> <p>Insert a bolt into the stretcher, and the jig hugs the bolt to align itself with the hole you drilled. The jig’s dimensions are determined by the length of the bolt you use and the thickness of the post.Make the jig from scrap. Two tabs on the underside, equal in length to the thickness of the post minus the counterbore for the bolt head, will straddle the bolt.</p> <p><a href=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192101/011196092_02_xl.jpg”><img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192101/011196092_02.jpg” alt=””/></a><br/>Designate a front end of the jig, insert the bolt between the tabs, then mark and cut a notch in the front edge at the point where the bolt protrudes. In use, the notch will be aligned over the bolt’s centerline, and halfway along the threaded area. Mark the stretcher at the notch to establish the nut-mortise location.</p> <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192101/011196092_03.jpg” alt=””/><br/>Using a square, mark in the mortise dimensions, then drill and chisel out the mortise. Repeat the process for the remaining bed bolts. <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192101/011196092_04.jpg” alt=””/><h3>On Mike Pekovich’s jig, the edge of the block represents the centerline of the bolt hole. Measure along the edge to locate the nut hole’s centerpoint, then you can quickly find it’s centerpoint on the bed rail.</h3> <p><strong>On Mike Pekovich’s jig, the edge of the block represents the centerline of the bolt hole. Measure along the edge to locate the nut hole’s centerpoint, then you can quickly find it’s centerpoint on the bed rail.</strong></p> <p>I drill the bed-bolt hole into the end of the bed rail as straight as I can, but you don’t need to drill the hole precisely at 90° to get the holes for the bed bolt and its nut to intersect precisely. Then, with a dowel and a simple layout jig, I locate the centerline of the hole and the center of the bed-bolt nut.</p> <p><a href=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192102/align-bed-bolts-01_xl.jpg”><img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192102/align-bed-bolts-01.jpg” alt=””/></a><br/>The jig consists of an 1/8-in.-thick hardboard piece glued into a kerf cut in block of wood. The kerf is set in from the edge of the block at half the diameter of the bed-bolt hole.</p> <p><a href=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192102/align-bed-bolts-02_xl.jpg”><img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192102/align-bed-bolts-02.jpg” alt=””/></a><br/>I insert a dowel the size of the hole in the bed rail, then snug up the jig against the dowel. The edge of the guide block gives me the bolt hole centerline, which I draw on the inside face of the rail. Along this line, I locate the center of the hole for the bed-bolt nut. This guarantees good results even if the bolt hole is off a few degrees.</p> <a href=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192103/align-bed-bolts-03_xl.jpg”><img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192102/align-bed-bolts-03.jpg” alt=””/></a> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 21 Nov 2012 02:03:10 +0000 Matt Kenney article Two Techniques for Bed-Bolt Alignment – FineWoodworking Learn how two simple jigs can make installing bed bolts a breeze http://www.finewoodworking.com/2012/11/20/two-techniques-for-bed-bolt-alignment http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192108/011231032_greene-greene-bed-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Learn how two simple jigs can make installing bed bolts a breeze Two Techniques for Bed-Bolt Alignment – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05192108/011231032_greene-greene-bed-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2012/11/20/two-techniques-for-bed-bolt-alignment Beds Construction Installing Hardware http://www.finewoodworking.com/2008/09/18/build-a-beautiful-bed http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2008/09/18/build-a-beautiful-bed <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153551/011184034-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Building a bed means working large-scale, with long rails, wide headboard assemblies, tall posts. The four projects shown here, made by some of the best woodworkers in the country, can help you cut that work down to size. They feature clear, helpful instructions and detailed drawings. You can also order complete plans for two of these projects from our plan store. Take a look:</p><table class=”show_design_border” cellspacing=”10″ cellpadding=”10″ width=”100%” bgcolor=”#F4E4B3″><tbody readability=”8.1960784313726″><tr readability=”7.5055350553506″><td><img title=”” height=”148″ alt=”” src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153549/011184034_sm.jpg” width=”115″ align=”left” border=”0″/> </td> <td readability=”7.4888059701493″> <p><a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=25401″ target=”_self”>A Pencil-Post Bed</a><br/><em>by Lonnie Bird<br/></em>Figured wood, subtle details, and a rich finish bring charm and elegance to this traditional design. <strong>Plus:</strong> Watch a <a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/Gallery/GalleryImage.aspx?id=25466″ target=”_self”>video</a> with Lonnie Bird describing the bed’s design and construction details. You can also <a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://store.taunton.com/onlinestore/item/pencil-post-bed-project-plan-011052.html” target=”_blank”>order a full-sized plan</a>.</p> </td> </tr><tr readability=”3.45″><td><img title=”” height=”85″ alt=”” src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153549/011156044_sm.jpg” width=”115″ align=”left” border=”0″/> </td> <td readability=”4.5762711864407″> <p><a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2787″ target=”_self”>Arts and Crafts Bed</a><br/><em>by Gary Rogowski<br/></em>An <em>FWW</em> contributing editor shows you how to use a router to create smooth curves and tight joinery. You can also <a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://store.taunton.com/onlinestore/item/arts-and-crafts-bed-project-plan-011054.html” target=”_blank”>order a full-sized plan</a>. </p> </td> </tr><tr readability=”8.2588235294118″><td><img title=”” height=”134″ alt=”” src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153550/011113042_sm.jpg” width=”115″ align=”left” border=”0″/> </td> <td readability=”8.25″> <p><a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=2357″ target=”_self”>Making a Sheraton Bed</a><br/><em>by Philip C. Lowe<br/></em>This award-winning woodworker shows you how to handle the most challenging part of this period-furniture piece–the posts. He explains how to make the blanks, turn and reed them, and put everything together. </p> </td> </tr><tr readability=”5.4230769230769″><td><img title=”” height=”124″ alt=”” src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153551/011197083-build-a-sleigh-bed_sm.jpg” width=”115″ align=”left” border=”0″/> </td> <td readability=”6.3190661478599″> <p><a class=”from-ed-orangelinks” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/ProjectsAndDesign/ProjectsAndDesignPDF.aspx?id=30244″ target=”_self”>New Twist on a Sleigh Bed</a><br/><em>by Charles Shackleton<br/></em>X-shaped back slats and hand-carved curls on the legs link this bed to furniture that Shackleton designed as an homage to fork-back chairs of his native Ireland. Jigs and templates simplify the construction .</p> </td> </tr></tbody></table><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Thu, 18 Sep 2008 04:00:00 +0000 Fine Woodworking editors article Build a Beautiful Bed – FineWoodworking Here’s a portfolio of project ideas from FWW experts. All with step-by-step instructions that show you how to handle the trickiest parts of construction. Complete project plans are also available. http://www.finewoodworking.com/2008/09/18/build-a-beautiful-bed http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153552/011184034-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Here’s a portfolio of project ideas from FWW experts. All with step-by-step instructions that show you how to handle the trickiest parts of construction. Complete project plans are also available. Build a Beautiful Bed – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05153552/011184034-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2008/09/18/build-a-beautiful-bed Beds Beds – Other

(Why?)

Published at

VcVJ74.jpg

How to Turn a Shaker Leg on a Lathe

Anissa Kapsales, Cari Delahanty

Originally published Dec 16, 2009

Learn how to turn Shaker-style leg that’s perfect for a cherry side table. (Find out how to build a table that matches this leg in Christian Becksvoort’s article Shaker Classic, 2 Ways.)

Turning this leg could be a bit of a challenge for a novice, but the techniques are pretty basic.

There are a few points to keep in mind:

  • The transition where the square top turns round
  • The ¼ -in.-wide ring just under that, the maximum diameter
  • The gentle taper down to the bottom of the leg

Going from the square top portion to the round at a 90° angle is a little tricky, since a false move can knock off the corners.

First, measure and mark the transition location on all four sides of the leg. Then begin turning with a ½ -in. gouge as close to that point as possible.

Next, with a diamond-point scraper held on edge, carefully cut in at 90°.

Move the tool straight in to slice and clean up the shoulders, cutting in just deep enough to form a round. Now clean up the round ring to about 1-1/4 in. dia. Just under that, cut in another 1⁄8 in. to reduce the diameter.

Mark down 5 in. and cut a thin line at the maximum diameter (1¼ in.). Then use the diamond-point tool to cut to the bottom. To form the swell taper, I use a gouge and turn from below the transition ring to the max point, then taper gently to the bottom.

Finish with sand paper and 0000 steel wool. Add a light bevel at the bottom. On all the legs (tapered and turned), I break square corners with P220-grit sandpaper.

Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox

×

(Why?)

Published at Tue, 17 Jan 2017 04:00:00 +0000

{amazon|100|campaign}

WCdx5k.jpg

Level Big Slabs in No Time Flat

Article Image

This shopmade router jig, designed by NBC sitcom star Nick Offerman, levels thick slabs to create Nakashima-style tabletops and other unique pieces. The heart of the jig is a trough that guides the router over the workpiece, allowing you to even out the high and low points as much as possible and retain the maximum possible thickness. It works relatively quickly, leaving only a few minutes of sanding left to do. For thicker slabs, Offerman shares a technique for routing flat channels in the bottom to hold the table base and leaving the rest of the bottom surface rough. He also shows how to clean up the sides and sand for a finish.

From Fine Woodworking #222

Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox

×

View PDF

(Why?)

Published at Thu, 29 Sep 2011 04:00:00 +0000

{amazon|100|campaign}

pCrG5o.jpg

Call For Entries: Student Work

Article Image

To recognize and support the work of students, Fine Woodworking will be devoting future Readers Gallery space to showcase current student work. Eligibility extends to current work by full-time students enrolled in the 2006/2007 school year in a high school (secondary) or post-secondary school program such as colleges and universities as well as woodworking, art, and design schools. The deadline for submissions is May 15, 2007.

Photographing your work
Taking good photos of your work is one way to improve your chance of being featured in the magazine or on FineWoodworking.com. Here are some tips:
– Shoot your work against a neutral background; a bed sheet or drop cloth will suffice.
– Make sure you have plenty of indirect light from windows or light fixtures.
– Take photos from many angles, overall and up close, to provide a complete presentation of your work.
– Clean the furniture, and don’t clutter the object with items such as books or collectibles.
– Do not alter the images or remove the background electronically.

How to make a submission
Download, Print and complete this form and send it along with any photos (prints, slides, or digital images on a photo CD) to:

Fine Woodworking Readers Gallery
The Taunton Press
63 South Main Street
Newtown, CT 06470-5506

Or, you can email your photos and information to fwgallery@taunton.com. Digital photos should be in high-resolution format and unaltered. If you would like your materials returned, please include a self-addressed envelope with proper postage.

Photo: Corey Martin crafted this tambour secretary desk as a first-year student at the Furniture Institute of Massachusetts. Photo by Matt Berger.

Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox

×

(Why?)

Published at Tue, 06 Mar 2007 05:00:00 +0000

UDCNnq.png

Full-size Templates—A Unique Way

Article Image

I produce a staggering number of full-size templates—sometimes exceeding a dozen for one piece of furniture. They are so easy to produce in SketchUp, and the more I create, the faster I can produce a piece of furniture. Not only are they used to re-create various arcs, tapers, and shapes, but also in the layout of dovetails and other joinery, turnings, inlay design, the location of pins, dowels, nails, and screws, and hardware installation.

If I had to produce these templates using plywood, or other wood and plastic products, my use of full-size templates would substantially diminish, and I’d be less efficient in the shop. It just takes too much time with these materials. I find thick poster board to be the best material. I buy it at art stores where I can obtain a thicker paper product than is available in typical school-grade poster boards. Using poster board allows me to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes.

Currently I’m building a Kitchen Dresser, circa 1750, with excellent bracket details and shapes. In fact, there are a number of beautiful shapes in this piece including the crown molding, scroll shapes in the sides and header, cutouts for the spoon rack, rounded feet, and dovetail joints. To re-create these shapes in the shop, full-size templates are critical.

Here is a view of the overall SketchUp model:

Assembly 3

Here is a perspective view of the side component that includes many of the complex shapes.

Side Perspective

And here are several of the templates needed in the shop – shown below in this order:

  • Crown Molding
  • Foot
  • Dovetails
  • Middle Bracket in Side Component
  • Spoon Rack
  • Upper Bracket in Side Component
  • Header

Crown Molding TemplateFootSide DovetailsSide Middle BracketSpoon RackUpper Bracket ShapesUpper Header

In the following video, I show how I produce templates in SketchUp with my home printer and 8 1/2 x 11 sheets. For my students, I use Layout and produce a PDF of full-size templates on large-scale paper. Thus students are not burdened with connecting multiple sheets of 8 1/2 x 11. But in my own work in the shop, I prefer printing on 8 1/2 x 11 sheets since the connecting of multiple sheets is quite easy and fast.

And here is a short video showing how I use the printouts from SketchUp to make the full-size templates.


Tim

@KillenWOOD

Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox

×

(Why?)

Published at Tue, 08 Nov 2016 15:55:46 +0000

6TFvGb.jpg

Sirrus Nexabond 2500

Article Image

Instant Glue Creates Strong Bond

Every now and then you come across a tool that dramatically changes the way you work. Nexabond 2500 is one of those tools. I use a lot of jigs when making furniture, and it’s the perfect glue for securing fences and other parts to them. It also works great for gluing solid-wood edge-banding to sheet goods, even around curves. And because it contains no water, it doesn’t cause materials like MDF to swell. The bond it forms between parts is amazingly strong, but for critical jig parts I’ll continue to reinforce the joint with screws.

Application is very easy. Just a few drops is all you need (don’t spread it over the entire joint like you do with PVA glues). Hold the parts together for a few minutes with clamps, and the joint is done. Edge-banding can be trimmed flush after just 30 minutes. But you don’t need to rush. Nexabond 2500 remains workable until you bring the two parts together and apply pressure. You can apply it to a joint and let it sit. It is available in three different set times: fast (1 to 3 minutes), medium (3 to 5 minutes), and slow (5 to 10 minutes). I use the medium set most frequently.

I also tried Nexabond 2500 for slip-tenon joinery on some small tables. The glue acted as a lubricant, making it easier to get the tenons into the mortises. However, joints must be really tight for the glue to activate. And the squeeze-out became rubbery and difficult to remove. Nexabond 2500 is great for jigs and edging, but I’ll stick with PVA glue for joinery.

Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox

×

Editor Test Results:

Overall Rating N/A

Manufacturer Specifications:

Manufacturer Sirrus
Manufacturer’s Web Site www.sirruschemistry.com
Manufacturer’s Phone Number 513.448.0308
Weight N/A
Dimensions N/A

(Why?)

Published at Wed, 04 Jun 2014 04:00:00 +0000

{amazon|100|campaign}

nfGCli.jpg

Mini Workbench Makes Detail Work Easier

Lisa Raleigh, Colin Russel, and Gary Junken

Period furniture maker Steve Latta first conceived of his “minibench” as a way to raise detail work to a more comfortable height, and to hold legs and other furniture parts for joinery cuts. Clamped atop his regular workbench, the minibench gets work closer to his eyes without having to bend over. The 42-in. long top is perfect for most furniture parts. It sports a vise on one end, and dog holes make it easy to hold parts.

In this short video, Fine Woodworking senior web producer Ed Pirnik offers a soup-to-nuts overview on the bench.

Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox

×

Get the Full-Size Plan

Visit the Taunton Store to purchase plans for the mini workbench.

Buy The Plan

(Why?)

Published at Wed, 22 Oct 2014 00:55:27 +0000

{amazon|100|campaign}

uMr7Mf.jpg

Shaker Side Table

Article Image

The Shakers designed and built a variety of beautiful round stands, but this one is the ultimate. Its slightly concave tapering post, thin top, and light, half-crescent legs are the epitome of classic Shaker design. The design has been refined over several versions until it is near to the original as possible. With a lathe and careful attention to detail, this classic is not hard to build. The post is turned and the curved legs are dovetailed into it. The top is a simple round with a smoothly curved edge profile.

Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox

×

View PDF

Get the Full-Size Plan

CAD-drawn plans and a cutlist for this project are available in the Fine Woodworking store.

Buy The Plan

(Why?)

Published at Wed, 05 Feb 2014 05:00:00 +0000

{amazon|100|campaign}