WCdx5k.jpg

Level Big Slabs in No Time Flat

Article Image

This shopmade router jig, designed by NBC sitcom star Nick Offerman, levels thick slabs to create Nakashima-style tabletops and other unique pieces. The heart of the jig is a trough that guides the router over the workpiece, allowing you to even out the high and low points as much as possible and retain the maximum possible thickness. It works relatively quickly, leaving only a few minutes of sanding left to do. For thicker slabs, Offerman shares a technique for routing flat channels in the bottom to hold the table base and leaving the rest of the bottom surface rough. He also shows how to clean up the sides and sand for a finish.

From Fine Woodworking #222

Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox

×

View PDF

(Why?)

Published at Thu, 29 Sep 2011 04:00:00 +0000

{amazon|100|campaign}

uMr7Mf.jpg

Shaker Side Table

Article Image

The Shakers designed and built a variety of beautiful round stands, but this one is the ultimate. Its slightly concave tapering post, thin top, and light, half-crescent legs are the epitome of classic Shaker design. The design has been refined over several versions until it is near to the original as possible. With a lathe and careful attention to detail, this classic is not hard to build. The post is turned and the curved legs are dovetailed into it. The top is a simple round with a smoothly curved edge profile.

Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox

×

View PDF

Get the Full-Size Plan

CAD-drawn plans and a cutlist for this project are available in the Fine Woodworking store.

Buy The Plan

(Why?)

Published at Wed, 05 Feb 2014 05:00:00 +0000

{amazon|100|campaign}

zAstjd.jpg

How to Engineer an Expanding Tabletop

John Hartman, Ed Pirnik, and Gary Junken

When it comes to building an expanding table, there are several ways to get the job done. Butterfly tables store the leaves beneath the top. When the top is pulled apart, the leaves swing up and unfold. It’s a beautiful solution but difficult to build. Perhaps the most common method is a top that pulls apart to accept leaves which simply drop into place, but that means storing the leaves in a dusty closet until they’re required.

Furniture maker Tommy MacDonald conceived of a hybrid solution. Two expansion leaves, one under each end, are pulled out from under the top on angled rails. It’s a solution that’s easy to construct, and allows for all the parts to rest within the table. That means no more trips to the closet for those extra leaves when company arrives.

Learn how the mechanism works with this short animation.

Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox

×

(Why?)

Published at Wed, 03 Dec 2014 21:16:23 +0000