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Cabinets – FineWoodworking


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I produce a staggering number of full-size templates—sometimes exceeding a dozen for one piece of furniture. They are so easy to produce in SketchUp, and the more I create, the faster I can produce a piece of furniture. Not only are they used to re-create various arcs, tapers, and shapes, but also in the layout of dovetails and other joinery, turnings, inlay design, the location of pins, dowels, nails, and screws, and hardware installation.

If I had to produce these templates using plywood, or other wood and plastic products, my use of full-size templates would substantially diminish, and I’d be less efficient in the shop. It just takes too much time with these materials. I find thick poster board to be the best material. I buy it at art stores where I can obtain a thicker paper product than is available in typical school-grade poster boards. Using poster board allows me to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes.

Currently I’m building a Kitchen Dresser, circa 1750, with excellent bracket details and shapes. In fact, there are a number of beautiful shapes in this piece including the crown molding, scroll shapes in the sides and header, cutouts for the spoon rack, rounded feet, and dovetail joints. To re-create these shapes in the shop, full-size templates are critical.

Here is a view of the overall SketchUp model:

Assembly 3

Here is a perspective view of the side component that includes many of the complex shapes.

Side Perspective

And here are several of the templates needed in the shop – shown below in this order:

  • Crown Molding
  • Foot
  • Dovetails
  • Middle Bracket in Side Component
  • Spoon Rack
  • Upper Bracket in Side Component
  • Header

Crown Molding TemplateFootSide DovetailsSide Middle BracketSpoon RackUpper Bracket ShapesUpper Header

In the following video, I show how I produce templates in SketchUp with my home printer and 8 1/2 x 11 sheets. For my students, I use Layout and produce a PDF of full-size templates on large-scale paper. Thus students are not burdened with connecting multiple sheets of 8 1/2 x 11. But in my own work in the shop, I prefer printing on 8 1/2 x 11 sheets since the connecting of multiple sheets is quite easy and fast.

And here is a short video showing how I use the printouts from SketchUp to make the full-size templates.


Tim

@KillenWOOD

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Chairs, Benches And Stools – FineWoodworking

Chairs, Benches And Stools – FineWoodworkingSleek and Shapely Coffee TableBook Excerpt: Pull Up A Chair by Mike DunbarMuseum bench

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fftr.fivefilters.org%2Fmakefulltextfeed.php%3Furl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.finewoodworking.com%252Fcategory%252Fchairs-benches-and-stools%252Ffeed%252F%26max%3D5&max=5 Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/08/sleek-and-shapely-coffee-table http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=228955 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/06062437/011260064.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>This table relies on graceful curves and sheer planes instead of ornamentation. It can be made entirely with hand tools, or with the combination of machines and hand tools that Michael Cullen uses here. MDF templates are used to lay out the curves and cutouts in the legs. The joinery is a combination of haunched mortise-and-tenons and doweling.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/228955/011260064.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 08 Feb 2017 19:33:01 +0000 Michael Cullen article Sleek and Shapely Coffee Table – FineWoodworking Hand-shaping brings out the beauty in this elemental piece http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/08/sleek-and-shapely-coffee-table http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/06062437/011260064.jpg summary_large_image Hand-shaping brings out the beauty in this elemental piece Sleek and Shapely Coffee Table – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/06062437/011260064.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/08/sleek-and-shapely-coffee-table Chairs, Benches And Stools http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/01/mike-dunbar-book-exerpt-giveaway http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=228577 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/26055444/dunbar.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p><strong><em><a href=”https://www.amazon.com/Pull-Up-Chair-Mike-Dunbar/dp/1511716010/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&amp;qid=&amp;sr=”>Pull Up A Chair</a></em></strong> is a collection of essays by Mike Dunbar, founder of The Windsor Institute. For years he sent monthly essays about chairs to his students and this volume covers 2007-2011. Below we feature an excerpt from Jan 15, 2011: Tennessee Chairmaker Frank Tabor.</p><p>2/8/17: We have a winner. James is the lucky winner. Come back for more great giveaways.</p> <p>1-15-11</p> <p><a href=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/26054823/image005.jpeg”><img class=”size-full wp-image-228579 alignleft” src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/26054823/image005.jpeg” alt=”image005″ width=”456″ height=”563″/></a></p> <p>To the left is a photograph of Tennessee chairmaker Frank Tabor. I know this because the photograph was once printed in a publication, or perhaps sent out by a news service. This is most fortunate; as otherwise, the subject would be anonymous. He’s known to us because the publication or news service attached information on the back that identifies Tabor, as well as the place and time. Curiously, the time was four days after I was born.</p> <p><a href=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/26054818/image006.jpeg”><img class=”alignright size-full wp-image-228578″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/26054818/image006.jpeg” alt=”image006″ width=”456″ height=”343″/></a></p> <p>This typewritten info is shown in the lower photo. Anyone who has worked in a newsroom will recognize the editor notations written in pencil. I have not transcribed the text, as I think you can easily read it. Note that the typist misspelled Tabor’s last name, writing it as Taber. That error did not help me in my research.</p> <p>A Google search for Frank Tabor (as opposed to Taber) comes up with the same picture on file in the Tennessee State Library and Archive. The photo was also included in the 2004 book Rural Life and Culture in the Upper Cumberland by Michael E. Birdwell and W. Calvin Dickinson. They write about Tabor: “Chair making has a long tradition in the Upper Cumberland. Men such as Preacher Tinch would harvest and season timber, carefully selecting the proper wood to make a sturdy chair that would last for generations. The Frank Tabor family from eastern Cumberland County made ladder-back chairs from oak, selling them at the Lowe shop in Rockwood and Bilbrey’s store in Crossville. Using traditional hand implements – axe, adz, maul, drawknife, and plane – the Tabors produced chairs for more than 30 years. Frank Tabor learned the craft from his grandfather, who primarily made wagons. The patriarch made chairs on the side, which he hauled from Westel to McMinnville and points in between, trading for salt, coffee, and sugar.</p> <p>“To make a chair, Tabor first hewed out a log with an axe. Sections of log were split and further shaped on a shaving horse, and the spokes were dressed down with a drawknife and carving knife. Wood chisels expertly tapped with a hand maul hewed the legs. The slats for the chair back were split and shaped on the shaving horse with a drawknife and plane. Pieces of the chair were driven together with mallets without nails, screws, or glue. The finished structure was then bottomed with white oak splints. Simple, functional, and strong, the chairs were held together by the tension created as the wood continued to cure, made sturdier by the tight split oak bottoms. Tabor chairs proved so sturdy that a popular saying in the region was, ‘Always club your enemy with a Tabor chair ‘cause it won’t shatter when you flail him.’ Frank Tabor made chairs until his death in 1968.”</p> <p>The above quote reads like it was written by historians, rather than chairmakers. We have a much better understanding of Tabor’s process and would not make their mistakes. Tabor began by felling a tree with an ax, not hewing it. Wood chisels were not tapped with a hand maul to hew the legs. They were turned on a lathe as is obvious from the picture, and as the illustrated text recounts. We know that Tabor’s lathe was a foot powered lathe, and he only attached a small gas engine after losing one of his legs. I would like to know more about that detail and wish someone had recorded it. The historians also focused on something that always amazes me, as this is often written about my work. “He makes these strong, beautiful Windsor chairs without any nails.” Yeah, and your point is?</p> <p>I did love the line about flailing your neighbor with a Tabor chair, because when he goes down, he will be down for the count. The advice is so matter of fact, one wonders if beating people over the head with a chair is a regular activity in Cumberland County. When you go out on Saturday night, do you select a chair to bring with you? “I don’t think I’ll take a Dunbar chair tonight. Ralph Quick is in town. Better bring a Tabor chair; it won’t shatter when I flail him with it.” Tabor himself was more modest and merely claimed his chairs would last 60 years.</p> <p>The photo is important as it gives us so much insight into a tradition that has faded, that of rural chairmaking. Frank, who along with one of his legs, appears to have also lost most of his teeth, is sitting against a log building. Some of his tools are propped up behind him. He is sitting in a chair and has pulled another back towards himself. Drawknife shavings are heaped up around him.</p> <p>Do you remember the recent picture of the English guy caning a chair seat (8-15-10) that I identified as a staged photo? I am sure it also occurred with this picture. I know because I’ve gone through the same thing over and over, every time a newspaper sends by a photographer. “Let’s get a picture of you working. Take that chair and pretend to being doing something to it. Wait, let me sprinkle some of these shavings around.”</p> <p>In this case, the photographer said to Frank, “Let’s take that chair and go outside where there is more light. Sit there against that really quaint log building and pretend to be doing something to that chair.”</p> <p>“The chair is done, yer damned fool,” Tabor replies. “There’s nothin’ more to do, but put a finish on it.”</p> <p>“I know. I know,” the photographer answers. “Just pretend. Wait. Let me gather some these shavings scattered around the yard. I’ll pile them around you so it looks like you’ve been doing something. Wait. Wait. We need some tools. I like that club. It looks rustic. Fits right in.”</p> <p>“Damned citified idiot,” Frank mutters under his breath. “I’ll goof on him by doin’ somethin’ that makes no sense, like pretending to draw a line on this top slat. That way, any chairmaker who sees this pitchah will know I was havin’ this damned fool on.”</p> <p>Over the past couple of decades Frank’s rustic tradition has influenced the way some Windsor chairmakers present ours. That is too bad and these people should know better. Quaintness may appeal to some customers, but it is a perversion of our craft’s history. Windsor chairs were an urban chair, and had almost no association with Frank’s craft tradition.</p> <p><a id=”rcwidget_vtot4by7″ class=”rcptr” href=”http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/e146318946/” rel=”nofollow” data-raflid=”e146318946″ data-theme=”classic” data-template=”5570be15bbd760130b386658″>a Rafflecopter giveaway</a><br/></p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 01 Feb 2017 14:05:06 +0000 Michael Dunbar article Book Excerpt: Pull Up A Chair by Mike Dunbar – FineWoodworking Pull Up A Chair is a collection of essays by Mike Dunbar, founder of The Windsor Institute. For years he sent monthly essays about chairs to his students and this volume … http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/01/mike-dunbar-book-exerpt-giveaway http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/26055444/dunbar.jpg summary_large_image Pull Up A Chair is a collection of essays by Mike Dunbar, founder of The Windsor Institute. For years he sent monthly essays about chairs to his students and this volume […] Book Excerpt: Pull Up A Chair by Mike Dunbar – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/26055444/dunbar.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/01/mike-dunbar-book-exerpt-giveaway Chairs, Benches And Stools http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/museum-bench http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226744 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114944/011259032-700×394.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Simple but not boring was the goal for this bench, which incorporates two tilted planes for the seat and wide, solid legs pierced with a keyhole slot at the center. Hurwitz refined the design in scale models and made a one-seat mockup to test the seat for comfort before he and his assistant built the real thing out of red elm.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/226744/011259032.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 02 Dec 2016 13:51:15 +0000 article Museum bench – FineWoodworking Simple but not boring was the goal for this bench, which incorporates two tilted planes for the seat and wide, solid legs pierced with a keyhole slot at the center http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/museum-bench http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114944/011259032.jpg summary_large_image Simple but not boring was the goal for this bench, which incorporates two tilted planes for the seat and wide, solid legs pierced with a keyhole slot at the center Museum bench – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114944/011259032.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/museum-bench Chairs, Benches And Stools Design

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Arts & Crafts Bed

Article Image Designed after a four-post bed by Gustav Stickley, this queen-size version features a Glasgow-style inlay and can be adapted to suit any mattress height. The construction is mortise-and-tenon, the posts are tapered, and the head- and foot-boards are curved. Kevin Rodel made this Arts and Crafts classic in the traditional white oak.

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Design – FineWoodworking

Design – FineWoodworkingBreadboard ends in SketchUp – Cutting Board Part 2Shaker Classic, 2 WaysDuncan Gowdy’s Illustrative Carving

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.finewoodworking.com%2Fcategory%2Fdesign%2Ffeed&amp;max=5 Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/26/breadboard-ends-sketchup-cutting-board-part-2 http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=228249 &lt;img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/26052903/killen.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/&gt;&lt;p&gt;In &lt;a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/23/sink-teeth-cutting-board”&gt;my last blog&lt;/a&gt;, I showed the first phase of constructing the Cutting Board for an undermount kitchen sink. I showed the development of the two main components, the center section and the two breadboard ends. In this blog, I finalize the construction by creating the joinery.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;There are many advantages to having breadboards in an application like this, but it also complicates the joinery. The breadboard grain direction is at right angles to the mid section, therefore creating a cross-grain issue with wood movement. The breadboard ends must allow expansion and contraction of the center section, otherwise it will create cracks. To allow this relative movement, the breadboards are not glued full length, rather fastened with screws (in this case) that can adjust within slots, rather than tight shank holes. I glue in the center tenon only.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;Here is the exploded model&nbsp;(in back edges format) showing the detail joinery.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;&lt;img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-228250″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14145908/Exploded-700×516.png” alt=”Exploded” width=”700″ height=”516″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14145908/Exploded-700×516.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14145908/Exploded-768×566.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14145908/Exploded.png 948w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/&gt;&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;The following video shows the detail joinery to allow this flexibility and relative movement of the components.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;&lt;iframe width=”640″ height=”360″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/dMH-zKqr7uk?feature=oembed” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””&gt;[embedded content]&lt;/iframe&gt;&lt;/p&gt; &lt;p&gt;Tim&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; @KillenWOOD&lt;/p&gt; &lt;div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″&gt; &lt;div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″&gt; &lt;p class=”article__cta__heading”&gt;Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox&lt;/p&gt; &lt;span class=”js-close article__cta__close”&gt;×&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;&lt;a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/strong&gt; &lt;a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”&gt;(Why?)&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt; Thu, 26 Jan 2017 14:29:22 +0000 Tim Killen article Breadboard ends in SketchUp – Cutting Board Part 2 – FineWoodworking Tim finishes up the model for his cutting board by adding attractive and functional breadboard ends http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/26/breadboard-ends-sketchup-cutting-board-part-2 http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14150310/Exploded-thumb-16×9.png summary_large_image Tim finishes up the model for his cutting board by adding attractive and functional breadboard ends Breadboard ends in SketchUp – Cutting Board Part 2 – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14150310/Exploded-thumb-16×9.png @KillenWOOD en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/26/breadboard-ends-sketchup-cutting-board-part-2 Design http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/01/shaker-classic-2-ways http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2010/01/01/shaker-classic-2-ways &lt;img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2010/01/18124317/Shaker-Classic-2-Ways-wp2.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/&gt;&lt;p&gt;These two Shaker tables are of basically the same design, with one major difference. The simple decision of whether to make tapered square legs or turned ones alters the whole feel of the table. The rest of the construction is standard mortise-and-tenon joinery, a dovetailed top rail, and a dovetailed drawer. A simple tapering jig makes quick work of the square legs, while the turned ones require a lathe and add a bit more of a challenge.&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;From &lt;em&gt;Fine Woodworking&lt;/em&gt; #210&lt;/p&gt; &lt;div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″&gt; &lt;div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″&gt; &lt;p class=”article__cta__heading”&gt;Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox&lt;/p&gt; &lt;span class=”js-close article__cta__close”&gt;×&lt;/span&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/9512/011210030.pdf” target=”_blank”&gt;View PDF&lt;/a&gt; &lt;div class=”store-project__plan”&gt;&lt;img class=”store-project__plan__image” src=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/app/uploads/uploadedimages/fine_woodworking_network/image_resources/in-house_ads/Project_Plans_th.jpg”/&gt;&lt;div class=”store-project__plan__copy”&gt; &lt;div class=”store-project__plan__text” readability=”32.5″&gt; &lt;h5 class=”store-project__plan__heading”&gt;Get the Full-Size Plan&lt;/h5&gt; &lt;div class=”store-project__plan__blurb” readability=”10″&gt; &lt;p&gt;Digital plans, a cutlist, and a SketchUp drawing for this project are available in the Fine Woodworking store.&lt;/p&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;a class=”store-project__plan__action” href=”http://www.tauntonstore.com/two-classic-shaker-tables-011269.html” target=”_blank”&gt;Buy The Plan&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/div&gt; &lt;/div&gt; &lt;p&gt;&lt;strong&gt;&lt;a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”&gt;&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/strong&gt; &lt;a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”&gt;(Why?)&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt; Sun, 01 Jan 2017 04:00:00 +0000 Christian Becksvoort article Shaker Classic, 2 Ways – FineWoodworking Change the legs to change the look of this classic piece http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/01/shaker-classic-2-ways http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2010/01/18124317/Shaker-Classic-2-Ways-wp2.jpg summary_large_image Change the legs to change the look of this classic piece Shaker Classic, 2 Ways – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2010/01/18124317/Shaker-Classic-2-Ways-wp2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/01/shaker-classic-2-ways Design Tables Shaker Tables – Side http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/14/duncan-gowdys-illustrative-carving http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=227418 &lt;p&gt;&lt;em&gt;[unable to retrieve full-text content]&lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;em&gt;[unable to retrieve full-text content]&lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;&lt;p&gt;&lt;em&gt;[unable to retrieve full-text content]&lt;/em&gt;&lt;/p&gt;Part furniture maker, part illustrator, Duncan Gowdy’s carvings are a signature that makes his work unique Wed, 14 Dec 2016 19:49:03 +0000 article Duncan Gowdy’s Illustrative Carving – FineWoodworking Part furniture maker, part illustrator, Duncan Gowdy’s carvings are a signature that makes his work unique http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/14/duncan-gowdys-illustrative-carving http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/12/14104802/gowdy.jpg summary_large_image Part furniture maker, part illustrator, Duncan Gowdy’s carvings are a signature that makes his work unique Duncan Gowdy’s Illustrative Carving – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/12/14104802/gowdy.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/14/duncan-gowdys-illustrative-carving Carving Design

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Design – FineWoodworking

Design – FineWoodworkingBreadboard ends in SketchUp – Cutting Board Part 2Shaker Classic, 2 WaysDuncan Gowdy’s Illustrative Carving

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fftr.fivefilters.org%2Fmakefulltextfeed.php%3Furl%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.finewoodworking.com%252Fcategory%252Fdesign%252Ffeed%26max%3D5&max=5 Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/26/breadboard-ends-sketchup-cutting-board-part-2 http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=228249 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/26052903/killen.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>In <a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/23/sink-teeth-cutting-board”>my last blog</a>, I showed the first phase of constructing the Cutting Board for an undermount kitchen sink. I showed the development of the two main components, the center section and the two breadboard ends. In this blog, I finalize the construction by creating the joinery.</p><p>There are many advantages to having breadboards in an application like this, but it also complicates the joinery. The breadboard grain direction is at right angles to the mid section, therefore creating a cross-grain issue with wood movement. The breadboard ends must allow expansion and contraction of the center section, otherwise it will create cracks. To allow this relative movement, the breadboards are not glued full length, rather fastened with screws (in this case) that can adjust within slots, rather than tight shank holes. I glue in the center tenon only.</p> <p>Here is the exploded model (in back edges format) showing the detail joinery.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-228250″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14145908/Exploded-700×516.png” alt=”Exploded” width=”700″ height=”516″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14145908/Exploded-700×516.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14145908/Exploded-768×566.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14145908/Exploded.png 948w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>The following video shows the detail joinery to allow this flexibility and relative movement of the components.</p> <p><iframe width=”640″ height=”360″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/dMH-zKqr7uk?feature=oembed” frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=””>[embedded content]</iframe></p> <p>Tim    @KillenWOOD</p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Thu, 26 Jan 2017 14:29:22 +0000 Tim Killen article Breadboard ends in SketchUp – Cutting Board Part 2 – FineWoodworking Tim finishes up the model for his cutting board by adding attractive and functional breadboard ends http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/26/breadboard-ends-sketchup-cutting-board-part-2 http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14150310/Exploded-thumb-16×9.png summary_large_image Tim finishes up the model for his cutting board by adding attractive and functional breadboard ends Breadboard ends in SketchUp – Cutting Board Part 2 – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/14150310/Exploded-thumb-16×9.png @KillenWOOD en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/26/breadboard-ends-sketchup-cutting-board-part-2 Design http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/01/shaker-classic-2-ways http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2010/01/01/shaker-classic-2-ways <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2010/01/18124317/Shaker-Classic-2-Ways-wp2.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>These two Shaker tables are of basically the same design, with one major difference. The simple decision of whether to make tapered square legs or turned ones alters the whole feel of the table. The rest of the construction is standard mortise-and-tenon joinery, a dovetailed top rail, and a dovetailed drawer. A simple tapering jig makes quick work of the square legs, while the turned ones require a lathe and add a bit more of a challenge.</p><p>From <em>Fine Woodworking</em> #210</p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/9512/011210030.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <div class=”store-project__plan”><img class=”store-project__plan__image” src=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/app/uploads/uploadedimages/fine_woodworking_network/image_resources/in-house_ads/Project_Plans_th.jpg”/><div class=”store-project__plan__copy”> <div class=”store-project__plan__text” readability=”32.5″> <h5 class=”store-project__plan__heading”>Get the Full-Size Plan</h5> <div class=”store-project__plan__blurb” readability=”10″> <p>Digital plans, a cutlist, and a SketchUp drawing for this project are available in the Fine Woodworking store.</p> </div> </div> <a class=”store-project__plan__action” href=”http://www.tauntonstore.com/two-classic-shaker-tables-011269.html” target=”_blank”>Buy The Plan</a></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Sun, 01 Jan 2017 04:00:00 +0000 Christian Becksvoort article Shaker Classic, 2 Ways – FineWoodworking Change the legs to change the look of this classic piece http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/01/shaker-classic-2-ways http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2010/01/18124317/Shaker-Classic-2-Ways-wp2.jpg summary_large_image Change the legs to change the look of this classic piece Shaker Classic, 2 Ways – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2010/01/18124317/Shaker-Classic-2-Ways-wp2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/01/01/shaker-classic-2-ways Design Tables Shaker Tables – Side http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/14/duncan-gowdys-illustrative-carving http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=227418 <p><em>[unable to retrieve full-text content]</em></p><p><em>[unable to retrieve full-text content]</em></p><p><em>[unable to retrieve full-text content]</em></p><p><em>[unable to retrieve full-text content]</em></p>Part furniture maker, part illustrator, Duncan Gowdy’s carvings are a signature that makes his work unique Wed, 14 Dec 2016 19:49:03 +0000 article Duncan Gowdy’s Illustrative Carving – FineWoodworking Part furniture maker, part illustrator, Duncan Gowdy’s carvings are a signature that makes his work unique http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/14/duncan-gowdys-illustrative-carving http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/12/14104802/gowdy.jpg summary_large_image Part furniture maker, part illustrator, Duncan Gowdy’s carvings are a signature that makes his work unique Duncan Gowdy’s Illustrative Carving – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/12/14104802/gowdy.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/14/duncan-gowdys-illustrative-carving Carving Design

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Chairs, Benches And Stools – FineWoodworking

Chairs, Benches And Stools – FineWoodworkingSleek and Shapely Coffee TableBook Excerpt: Pull Up A Chair by Mike DunbarMuseum bench

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.finewoodworking.com%2Fcategory%2Fchairs-benches-and-stools%2Ffeed%2F&max=5 Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/08/sleek-and-shapely-coffee-table http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=228955 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/06062437/011260064.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>This table relies on graceful curves and sheer planes instead of ornamentation. It can be made entirely with hand tools, or with the combination of machines and hand tools that Michael Cullen uses here. MDF templates are used to lay out the curves and cutouts in the legs. The joinery is a combination of haunched mortise-and-tenons and doweling.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/228955/011260064.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 08 Feb 2017 19:33:01 +0000 Michael Cullen article Sleek and Shapely Coffee Table – FineWoodworking Hand-shaping brings out the beauty in this elemental piece http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/08/sleek-and-shapely-coffee-table http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/06062437/011260064.jpg summary_large_image Hand-shaping brings out the beauty in this elemental piece Sleek and Shapely Coffee Table – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/06062437/011260064.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/08/sleek-and-shapely-coffee-table Chairs, Benches And Stools http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/01/mike-dunbar-book-exerpt-giveaway http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=228577 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/26055444/dunbar.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p><strong><em><a href=”https://www.amazon.com/Pull-Up-Chair-Mike-Dunbar/dp/1511716010/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&amp;qid=&amp;sr=”>Pull Up A Chair</a></em></strong> is a collection of essays by Mike Dunbar, founder of The Windsor Institute. For years he sent monthly essays about chairs to his students and this volume covers 2007-2011. Below we feature an excerpt from Jan 15, 2011: Tennessee Chairmaker Frank Tabor.</p><p>2/8/17: We have a winner. James is the lucky winner. Come back for more great giveaways.</p> <p>1-15-11</p> <p><a href=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/26054823/image005.jpeg”><img class=”size-full wp-image-228579 alignleft” src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/26054823/image005.jpeg” alt=”image005″ width=”456″ height=”563″/></a></p> <p>To the left is a photograph of Tennessee chairmaker Frank Tabor. I know this because the photograph was once printed in a publication, or perhaps sent out by a news service. This is most fortunate; as otherwise, the subject would be anonymous. He’s known to us because the publication or news service attached information on the back that identifies Tabor, as well as the place and time. Curiously, the time was four days after I was born.</p> <p><a href=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/26054818/image006.jpeg”><img class=”alignright size-full wp-image-228578″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/01/26054818/image006.jpeg” alt=”image006″ width=”456″ height=”343″/></a></p> <p>This typewritten info is shown in the lower photo. Anyone who has worked in a newsroom will recognize the editor notations written in pencil. I have not transcribed the text, as I think you can easily read it. Note that the typist misspelled Tabor’s last name, writing it as Taber. That error did not help me in my research.</p> <p>A Google search for Frank Tabor (as opposed to Taber) comes up with the same picture on file in the Tennessee State Library and Archive. The photo was also included in the 2004 book Rural Life and Culture in the Upper Cumberland by Michael E. Birdwell and W. Calvin Dickinson. They write about Tabor: “Chair making has a long tradition in the Upper Cumberland. Men such as Preacher Tinch would harvest and season timber, carefully selecting the proper wood to make a sturdy chair that would last for generations. The Frank Tabor family from eastern Cumberland County made ladder-back chairs from oak, selling them at the Lowe shop in Rockwood and Bilbrey’s store in Crossville. Using traditional hand implements – axe, adz, maul, drawknife, and plane – the Tabors produced chairs for more than 30 years. Frank Tabor learned the craft from his grandfather, who primarily made wagons. The patriarch made chairs on the side, which he hauled from Westel to McMinnville and points in between, trading for salt, coffee, and sugar.</p> <p>“To make a chair, Tabor first hewed out a log with an axe. Sections of log were split and further shaped on a shaving horse, and the spokes were dressed down with a drawknife and carving knife. Wood chisels expertly tapped with a hand maul hewed the legs. The slats for the chair back were split and shaped on the shaving horse with a drawknife and plane. Pieces of the chair were driven together with mallets without nails, screws, or glue. The finished structure was then bottomed with white oak splints. Simple, functional, and strong, the chairs were held together by the tension created as the wood continued to cure, made sturdier by the tight split oak bottoms. Tabor chairs proved so sturdy that a popular saying in the region was, ‘Always club your enemy with a Tabor chair ‘cause it won’t shatter when you flail him.’ Frank Tabor made chairs until his death in 1968.”</p> <p>The above quote reads like it was written by historians, rather than chairmakers. We have a much better understanding of Tabor’s process and would not make their mistakes. Tabor began by felling a tree with an ax, not hewing it. Wood chisels were not tapped with a hand maul to hew the legs. They were turned on a lathe as is obvious from the picture, and as the illustrated text recounts. We know that Tabor’s lathe was a foot powered lathe, and he only attached a small gas engine after losing one of his legs. I would like to know more about that detail and wish someone had recorded it. The historians also focused on something that always amazes me, as this is often written about my work. “He makes these strong, beautiful Windsor chairs without any nails.” Yeah, and your point is?</p> <p>I did love the line about flailing your neighbor with a Tabor chair, because when he goes down, he will be down for the count. The advice is so matter of fact, one wonders if beating people over the head with a chair is a regular activity in Cumberland County. When you go out on Saturday night, do you select a chair to bring with you? “I don’t think I’ll take a Dunbar chair tonight. Ralph Quick is in town. Better bring a Tabor chair; it won’t shatter when I flail him with it.” Tabor himself was more modest and merely claimed his chairs would last 60 years.</p> <p>The photo is important as it gives us so much insight into a tradition that has faded, that of rural chairmaking. Frank, who along with one of his legs, appears to have also lost most of his teeth, is sitting against a log building. Some of his tools are propped up behind him. He is sitting in a chair and has pulled another back towards himself. Drawknife shavings are heaped up around him.</p> <p>Do you remember the recent picture of the English guy caning a chair seat (8-15-10) that I identified as a staged photo? I am sure it also occurred with this picture. I know because I’ve gone through the same thing over and over, every time a newspaper sends by a photographer. “Let’s get a picture of you working. Take that chair and pretend to being doing something to it. Wait, let me sprinkle some of these shavings around.”</p> <p>In this case, the photographer said to Frank, “Let’s take that chair and go outside where there is more light. Sit there against that really quaint log building and pretend to be doing something to that chair.”</p> <p>“The chair is done, yer damned fool,” Tabor replies. “There’s nothin’ more to do, but put a finish on it.”</p> <p>“I know. I know,” the photographer answers. “Just pretend. Wait. Let me gather some these shavings scattered around the yard. I’ll pile them around you so it looks like you’ve been doing something. Wait. Wait. We need some tools. I like that club. It looks rustic. Fits right in.”</p> <p>“Damned citified idiot,” Frank mutters under his breath. “I’ll goof on him by doin’ somethin’ that makes no sense, like pretending to draw a line on this top slat. That way, any chairmaker who sees this pitchah will know I was havin’ this damned fool on.”</p> <p>Over the past couple of decades Frank’s rustic tradition has influenced the way some Windsor chairmakers present ours. That is too bad and these people should know better. Quaintness may appeal to some customers, but it is a perversion of our craft’s history. Windsor chairs were an urban chair, and had almost no association with Frank’s craft tradition.</p> <p><a id=”rcwidget_vtot4by7″ class=”rcptr” href=”http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/e146318946/” rel=”nofollow” data-raflid=”e146318946″ data-theme=”classic” data-template=”5570be15bbd760130b386658″>a Rafflecopter giveaway</a><br/></p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 01 Feb 2017 14:05:06 +0000 Michael Dunbar article Book Excerpt: Pull Up A Chair by Mike Dunbar – FineWoodworking Pull Up A Chair is a collection of essays by Mike Dunbar, founder of The Windsor Institute. For years he sent monthly essays about chairs to his students and this volume … http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/01/mike-dunbar-book-exerpt-giveaway http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/26055444/dunbar.jpg summary_large_image Pull Up A Chair is a collection of essays by Mike Dunbar, founder of The Windsor Institute. For years he sent monthly essays about chairs to his students and this volume […] Book Excerpt: Pull Up A Chair by Mike Dunbar – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2017/02/26055444/dunbar.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2017/02/01/mike-dunbar-book-exerpt-giveaway Chairs, Benches And Stools http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/museum-bench http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226744 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114944/011259032-700×394.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Simple but not boring was the goal for this bench, which incorporates two tilted planes for the seat and wide, solid legs pierced with a keyhole slot at the center. Hurwitz refined the design in scale models and made a one-seat mockup to test the seat for comfort before he and his assistant built the real thing out of red elm.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/226744/011259032.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 02 Dec 2016 13:51:15 +0000 article Museum bench – FineWoodworking Simple but not boring was the goal for this bench, which incorporates two tilted planes for the seat and wide, solid legs pierced with a keyhole slot at the center http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/museum-bench http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114944/011259032.jpg summary_large_image Simple but not boring was the goal for this bench, which incorporates two tilted planes for the seat and wide, solid legs pierced with a keyhole slot at the center Museum bench – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114944/011259032.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/museum-bench Chairs, Benches And Stools Design

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Designer’s Notebook: Better Built-ins

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A room full of built-ins doesn’t have to be symmetrical and standardized. The space can have plenty of shapes, tones, and textures to please the eye and attract the touch. Dean Pulver designs built-ins with a balance of straight lines and curves, hard shapes with softer ones, and smooth planes with textured surfaces.

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Cabinets – FineWoodworking

Cabinets – FineWoodworkingDisplay Cabinet on a StandTongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen DresserFull-size Templates—A Unique Way

http://ftr.fivefilters.org/makefulltextfeed.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.finewoodworking.com%2Fcategory%2Fcabinets%2Ffeed%2F&max=5 Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226618 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034-700×394.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>Joinery takes center stage in this cabinet-on-stand. The base and case are made with contrasting woods, but the straight grain of the riftsawn stock unifies the two. An apron and rail on each side of the case make for a strong, light-looking base. A wide upper front apron paired with a narrow lower rail accomplishes the same objective. The base is joined with through-mortise-and-tenons, lightened with tapers and curves. Latticework on the front door dresses up the dovetailed cabinet on top.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/226618/011259034.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <div class=”store-project__plan”><img class=”store-project__plan__image” src=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/app/uploads/uploadedimages/fine_woodworking_network/image_resources/in-house_ads/Project_Plans_th.jpg”/><div class=”store-project__plan__copy”> <div class=”store-project__plan__text” readability=”31.5″> <h5 class=”store-project__plan__heading”>Get the Full-Size Plan</h5> <div class=”store-project__plan__blurb” readability=”8″> <p>Printed and digital plans and a cutlist for this project are available in the Fine Woodworking store.</p> </div> </div> <a class=”store-project__plan__action” href=”https://www.tauntonstore.com/kumiko-cabinet-on-stand.html” target=”_blank”>Buy The Plan</a></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Fri, 02 Dec 2016 13:51:02 +0000 Michael Pekovich article Display Cabinet on a Stand – FineWoodworking Eye-catching details and contrasting woods make this a case to remember http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034.jpg summary_large_image Eye-catching details and contrasting woods make this a case to remember Display Cabinet on a Stand – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/29114921/011259034.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/12/02/display-cabinet-on-a-stand Cabinets Cabinet-on-Stand http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=226446 <p>Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this style of joinery, which also includes a 1/4-in. beaded edge. A paneled door would be a much safer design as it inherently allows for seasonal wood movement. To accommodate wood movement in the tongue-and-groove door is much more complicated. The joints cannot be glued and must be able to move, allowing the door width to expand and contract. As shown in the video below, I include 1/16-in. gaps at each joint and on the right and left edges. To maintain door integrity, horizontal and diagonal battens are connected to the back face of the door. The battens are attached with wood screws in slotted shank holes, again to allow for the seasonal movement.</p> <p>Here is the dresser assembly with the door removed from its opening.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226447″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-700×711.png” alt=”Door Removed” width=”700″ height=”711″/></p> <p>The back face of the door includes two horizontal battens and one diagonal batten held with wood screws in slotted shank holes (no glue).</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226501″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-700×749.png” alt=”Door Rear View” width=”700″ height=”749″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-700×749.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View-768×822.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195028/Door-Rear-View.png 782w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>This shows the top edges of the assembled door and copies of the two components pulled out in front. You can see the 1/16-in. gaps in the tongue-and-groove joints.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226449″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-700×400.png” alt=”Top View Door Components” width=”700″ height=”400″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-700×400.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-768×439.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components-1200×686.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192843/Top-View-Door-Components.png 1354w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Here is the video:</p> <p><iframe src=”//www.youtube.com/embed/tpPCxukDing” width=”560″ height=”314″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe></p> <p>Here is the progress in the shop—all material is Monterey Pine.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-226502″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-700×933.jpg” alt=”IMG_5964″ width=”700″ height=”933″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-700×933.jpg 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-768×1024.jpg 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/21195141/IMG_5964-e1479790574840-1200×1600.jpg 1200w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Tim</p> <p>@KillenWOOD</p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 22 Nov 2016 05:01:34 +0000 article Tongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen Dresser – FineWoodworking Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this … http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-e1479821861598.png summary_large_image Continuing on my Kitchen Dresser project, I’ll get to the design for the tongue-and-groove door. In this 1750s Pennsylvania German piece, both the back panel and the front door use this […] Tongue-and-Groove Door for the Kitchen Dresser – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/18192739/Door-Removed-e1479821861598.png @KillenWOOD en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/22/tongue-groove-door-kitchen-dresser Cabinets http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way http://www.finewoodworking.com/?p=225862 <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150555/Shape-Middle-Side-700×452.png” alt=”Article Image”/><p>I produce a staggering number of full-size templates—sometimes exceeding a dozen for one piece of furniture. They are so easy to produce in SketchUp, and the more I create, the faster I can produce a piece of furniture. Not only are they used to re-create various arcs, tapers, and shapes, but also in the layout of dovetails and other joinery, turnings, inlay design, the location of pins, dowels, nails, and screws, and hardware installation.</p><p>If I had to produce these templates using plywood, or other wood and plastic products, my use of full-size templates would substantially diminish, and I’d be less efficient in the shop. It just takes too much time with these materials. I find thick poster board to be the best material. I buy it at art stores where I can obtain a thicker paper product than is available in typical school-grade poster boards. Using poster board allows me to use an X-Acto knife to cut the shapes.</p> <p>Currently I’m building a Kitchen Dresser, circa 1750, with excellent bracket details and shapes. In fact, there are a number of beautiful shapes in this piece including the crown molding, scroll shapes in the sides and header, cutouts for the spoon rack, rounded feet, and dovetail joints. To re-create these shapes in the shop, full-size templates are critical.</p> <p>Here is a view of the overall SketchUp model:</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225863″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-700×769.png” alt=”Assembly 3″ width=”700″ height=”769″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-700×769.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3-768×844.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150532/Assembly-3.png 810w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>Here is a perspective view of the side component that includes many of the complex shapes.</p> <p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225869″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150615/Side-Perspective.png” alt=”Side Perspective” width=”532″ height=”875″/></p> <p>And here are several of the templates needed in the shop – shown below in this order:</p> <ul><li>Crown Molding</li> <li>Foot</li> <li>Dovetails</li> <li>Middle Bracket in Side Component</li> <li>Spoon Rack</li> <li>Upper Bracket in Side Component</li> <li>Header</li> </ul><p><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225864″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template.png” alt=”Crown Molding Template” width=”669″ height=”671″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template.png 669w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150539/Crown-Molding-Template-300×300.png 300w” sizes=”(max-width: 669px) 100vw, 669px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225865″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-700×167.png” alt=”Foot” width=”700″ height=”167″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-700×167.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-768×183.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot-1200×286.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150545/Foot.png 1462w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225867″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-700×310.png” alt=”Side Dovetails” width=”700″ height=”310″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-700×310.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails-768×340.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150602/Side-Dovetails.png 1025w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225868″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-700×664.png” alt=”Side Middle Bracket” width=”700″ height=”664″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-700×664.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket-768×729.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150609/Side-Middle-Bracket.png 918w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225870″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-700×302.png” alt=”Spoon Rack” width=”700″ height=”302″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-700×302.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack-768×331.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150623/Spoon-Rack.png 861w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225871″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-700×569.png” alt=”Upper Bracket Shapes” width=”700″ height=”569″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-700×569.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes-768×624.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150637/Upper-Bracket-Shapes.png 947w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/><img class=”alignnone size-medium wp-image-225872″ src=”https://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-700×284.png” alt=”Upper Header” width=”700″ height=”284″ srcset=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-700×284.png 700w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-768×311.png 768w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header-1200×486.png 1200w, http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/04150646/Upper-Header.png 1217w” sizes=”(max-width: 700px) 100vw, 700px”/></p> <p>In the following video, I show how I produce templates in SketchUp with my home printer and 8 1/2 x 11 sheets. For my students, I use Layout and produce a PDF of full-size templates on large-scale paper. Thus students are not burdened with connecting multiple sheets of 8 1/2 x 11. But in my own work in the shop, I prefer printing on 8 1/2 x 11 sheets since the connecting of multiple sheets is quite easy and fast.</p> <p><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/8j7vGazbtzU?rel=0″ width=”560″ height=”315″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe></p> <p>And here is a short video showing how I use the printouts from SketchUp to make the full-size templates.</p> <p><iframe src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/DAIiLO1mEuw?rel=0″ width=”560″ height=”315″ frameborder=”0″ allowfullscreen=”allowfullscreen”>[embedded content]</iframe><br/>Tim</p> <p>@KillenWOOD</p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 08 Nov 2016 15:55:46 +0000 Tim Killen article Full-size Templates—A Unique Way – FineWoodworking Creating full size templates from SketchUp is easier than you think http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/07064010/Shape-Middle-Side-thumb-16×9.png summary_large_image Creating full size templates from SketchUp is easier than you think Full-size Templates—A Unique Way – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/11/07064010/Shape-Middle-Side-thumb-16×9.png @KillenWOOD en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2016/11/08/full-size-templates-unique-way Cabinets Sketchup

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Desks – FineWoodworking

Desks – FineWoodworkingBuild a Shaker Lap DeskMining Danish ModernCall For Entries: Student Work

http://www.finewoodworking.com Expert advice on woodworking and furniture making, with thousands of how-to videos, step-by-step articles, project plans, photo galleries, tool reviews, blogs, and more http://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/12/build-a-shaker-lap-desk http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/12/build-a-shaker-lap-desk <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200207/011248024_shaker-lap-desk-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>This classic Shaker lap desk is made of white pine and features exposed dovetails, breadboard ends with cherry pegs, and a small inside drawer. The case is traditional dovetail construction, with dividers set into dadoes inside to form handy compartments, including a tiny inkwell drawer. The bottom extends beyond the case and has a quarter-round profile routed into all four edges. Lap desks were designed two centuries ago to function as  miniature traveling offices with room for paper, envelopes, pens, and ink. Today, their precise joinery and elegant design still proves popular, whether they are used for writing the old-fashioned way or as storage space for a laptop or tablet.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/19594/011248024.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <div class=”store-project__plan”><img class=”store-project__plan__image” src=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/app/uploads/uploadedimages/fine_woodworking_network/image_resources/in-house_ads/Project_Plans_th.jpg”/><div class=”store-project__plan__copy”> <div class=”store-project__plan__text” readability=”33.5″> <h5 class=”store-project__plan__heading”>Get the Full-Size Plan</h5> <div class=”store-project__plan__blurb” readability=”12″> <p>Build a classic Shaker lap desk with this printed plan. Designed by veteran woodworker Christian Becksvoort, this charming traveling desk recreates the era when pen and ink reigned. To craft your own version, one that can house your laptop, start with a copy of the Shaker Lap Desk printed plan.</p> </div> </div> <a class=”store-project__plan__action” href=”http://www.tauntonstore.com/shaker-lap-desk-printed-plan-011507.html” target=”_blank”>Buy The Plan</a></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 13 May 2015 00:08:45 +0000 Christian Becksvoort article Build a Shaker Lap Desk – FineWoodworking Celebrate pen and ink with this quintessential case http://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/12/build-a-shaker-lap-desk http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200208/011248024_shaker-lap-desk-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Celebrate pen and ink with this quintessential case Build a Shaker Lap Desk – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05200208/011248024_shaker-lap-desk-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2015/05/12/build-a-shaker-lap-desk Design Desks Desks – Writing Shaker http://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/12/03/mining-danish-modern http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2014/12/03/mining-danish-modern <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05195606/011245026_mining-danish-modern-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>In this first Designer’s Notebook department, we take a look at the inspiration and design process behind a desk by Timothy Rousseau. The inspiration was Danish Modern, and the end view of the desk was the element that consumed much of the maker’s initial energy. But the process of designing furniture is influenced by lots of different things, and some of them are unintended. In this case, time constraints came into play and helped to simplify and clarify Rousseau’s vision of the desk. The end result? Judge for yourselves.</p><div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <a class=”button__pdf-download” data-ga-event=”PDF Download” href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/membership/pdf/19410/011245026.pdf” target=”_blank”>View PDF</a> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Wed, 03 Dec 2014 05:00:00 +0000 Tim Rousseau article Mining Danish Modern – FineWoodworking Inspiration behind a successful desk design http://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/12/03/mining-danish-modern http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05195607/011245026_mining-danish-modern-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Inspiration behind a successful desk design Mining Danish Modern – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05195607/011245026_mining-danish-modern-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2014/12/03/mining-danish-modern Design Desks Modern http://www.finewoodworking.com/2007/03/06/call-for-entries-student-work http://beta.finewoodworking.com/2007/03/06/call-for-entries-student-work <img src=”http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05152611/martin_secretary_desk-main.jpg” alt=”Article Image”/><p>To recognize and support the work of students, <em>Fine Woodworking</em> will be devoting future Readers Gallery space to showcase current student work. Eligibility extends to current work by full-time students enrolled in the 2006/2007 school year in a high school (secondary) or post-secondary school program such as colleges and universities as well as woodworking, art, and design schools. The deadline for submissions is May 15, 2007.</p><p><strong>Photographing your work</strong><br/>Taking good photos of your work is one way to improve your chance of being featured in the magazine or on FineWoodworking.com. Here are some tips:<br/>– Shoot your work against a neutral background; a bed sheet or drop cloth will suffice.<br/>– Make sure you have plenty of indirect light from windows or light fixtures.<br/>– Take photos from many angles, overall and up close, to provide a complete presentation of your work.<br/>– Clean the furniture, and don’t clutter the object with items such as books or collectibles.<br/>– Do not alter the images or remove the background electronically.</p> <p><strong>How to make a submission<br/></strong>Download, Print and complete <a href=”http://www.finewoodworking.com/FWNPDFfree/student_gallery.pdf” target=”_blank”>this form</a> and send it along with any photos (prints, slides, or digital images on a photo CD) to:</p> <p>Fine Woodworking Readers Gallery<br/>The Taunton Press<br/>63 South Main Street<br/>Newtown, CT 06470-5506</p> <p>Or, you can email your photos and information to <a href=”mailto:fwgallery@taunton.com”>fwgallery@taunton.com</a>. Digital photos should be in high-resolution format and unaltered. If you would like your materials returned, please include a self-addressed envelope with proper postage.</p> <p><em>Photo: Corey Martin crafted this tambour secretary desk as a first-year student at the Furniture Institute of Massachusetts. Photo by Matt Berger.</em></p> <div class=”article__cta fww-newsletter” readability=”31.5″> <div class=”article__cta__form” readability=”33″> <p class=”article__cta__heading”>Get woodworking tips, expert advice and special offers in your inbox</p> <span class=”js-close article__cta__close”>×</span></div> </div> <p><strong><a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org”></a></strong> <a href=”https://blockads.fivefilters.org/acceptable.html”>(Why?)</a></p> Tue, 06 Mar 2007 05:00:00 +0000 Fine Woodworking editors article Call For Entries: Student Work – FineWoodworking Fine Woodworking Readers Gallery to highlight woodworkers in high school or post-secondary programs http://www.finewoodworking.com/2007/03/06/call-for-entries-student-work http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05152612/martin_secretary_desk-thumb2.jpg summary_large_image Fine Woodworking Readers Gallery to highlight woodworkers in high school or post-secondary programs Call For Entries: Student Work – FineWoodworking http://s3.amazonaws.com/finewoodworking.s3.tauntoncloud.com/app/uploads/2016/09/05152612/martin_secretary_desk-thumb2.jpg en-US text/html http://www.finewoodworking.com/2007/03/06/call-for-entries-student-work Design Desks Custom Design Desks – Secretary

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